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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吴宇晗 大小:DcCqxGK140676KB 下载:OEuUA9vx55263次
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日期:2020-08-13 06:15:17
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孙丽琴

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.
2.  Then Telemachus spoke. "Great heavens!" he exclaimed, "Jove musthave robbed me of my senses. Here is my dear and excellent mothersaying she will quit this house and marry again, yet I am laughing andenjoying myself as though there were nothing happening. But,suitors, as the contest has been agreed upon, let it go forward. It isfor a woman whose peer is not to be found in Pylos, Argos, orMycene, nor yet in Ithaca nor on the mainland. You know this as wellas I do; what need have I to speak in praise of my mother? Come on,then, make no excuses for delay, but let us see whether you can stringthe bow or no. I too will make trial of it, for if I can string it andshoot through the iron, I shall not suffer my mother to quit thishouse with a stranger, not if I can win the prizes which my father wonbefore me."
3.  A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.
4.  "Therefore, my dear young friend, I returned without hearinganything about the others. I know neither who got home safely norwho were lost but, as in duty bound, I will give you without reservethe reports that have reached me since I have been here in my ownhouse. They say the Myrmidons returned home safely under Achilles' sonNeoptolemus; so also did the valiant son of Poias, Philoctetes.Idomeneus, again, lost no men at sea, and all his followers whoescaped death in the field got safe home with him to Crete. Nomatter how far out of the world you live, you will have heard ofAgamemnon and the bad end he came to at the hands of Aegisthus- anda fearful reckoning did Aegisthus presently pay. See what a good thingit is for a man to leave a son behind him to do as Orestes did, whokilled false Aegisthus the murderer of his noble father. You too,then- for you are a tall, smart-looking fellow- show your mettle andmake yourself a name in story."
5.  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
6.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, we admiredthe island and wandered all over it, while the nymphs Jove's daughtersroused the wild goats that we might get some meat for our dinner. Onthis we fetched our spears and bows and arrows from the ships, anddividing ourselves into three bands began to shoot the goats. Heavensent us excellent sport; I had twelve ships with me, and each ship gotnine goats, while my own ship had ten; thus through the livelong dayto the going down of the sun we ate and drank our fill,- and we hadplenty of wine left, for each one of us had taken many jars fullwhen we sacked the city of the Cicons, and this had not yet run out.While we were feasting we kept turning our eyes towards the land ofthe Cyclopes, which was hard by, and saw the smoke of their stubblefires. We could almost fancy we heard their voices and the bleating oftheir sheep and goats, but when the sun went down and it came on dark,we camped down upon the beach, and next morning I called a council.

计划指导

1.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
2.  "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'
3.  "There I tried to land, but could not, for it was a bad place andthe waves dashed me against the rocks, so I again took to the seaand swam on till I came to a river that seemed the most likely landingplace, for there were no rocks and it was sheltered from the wind.Here, then, I got out of the water and gathered my senses togetheragain. Night was coming on, so I left the river, and went into athicket, where I covered myself all over with leaves, and presentlyheaven sent me off into a very deep sleep. Sick and sorry as I was Islept among the leaves all night, and through the next day tillafternoon, when I woke as the sun was westering, and saw yourdaughter's maid servants playing upon the beach, and your daughteramong them looking like a goddess. I besought her aid, and sheproved to be of an excellent disposition, much more so than could beexpected from so young a person- for young people are apt to bethoughtless. She gave me plenty of bread and wine, and when she hadhad me washed in the river she also gave me the clothes in which yousee me. Now, therefore, though it has pained me to do so, I havetold you the whole truth."
4.  Then the vision said, "Take heart, and be not so much dismayed.There is one gone with him whom many a man would be glad enough tohave stand by his side, I mean Minerva; it is she who has compassionupon you, and who has sent me to bear you this message."
5.  "Now," said he, "that our guests have done their dinner, it willbe best to ask them who they are. Who, then, sir strangers, are you,and from what port have you sailed? Are you traders? or do you sailthe seas as rovers with your hand against every man, and every man'shand against you?"
6.  When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.

推荐功能

1.  Noemon then went back to his father's house, but Antinous andEurymachus were very angry. They told the others to leave off playing,and to come and sit down along with themselves. When they came,Antinous son of Eupeithes spoke in anger. His heart was black withrage, and his eyes flashed fire as he said:
2.  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
3.  As he spoke Jove sent two eagles from the top of the mountain, andthey flew on and on with the wind, sailing side by side in their ownlordly flight. When they were right over the middle of the assemblythey wheeled and circled about, beating the air with their wings andglaring death into the eyes of them that were below; then, fightingfiercely and tearing at one another, they flew off towards the rightover the town. The people wondered as they saw them, and asked eachother what an this might be; whereon Halitherses, who was the bestprophet and reader of omens among them, spoke to them plainly and inall honesty, saying:
4.  "Having so said she dived under the waves, whereon I turned backto the place where my ships were ranged upon the shore; and my heartwas clouded with care as I went along. When I reached my ship we gotsupper ready, for night was falling, and camped down upon the beach.
5.   "Eurymachus," answered Ulysses, "if you and I were to work oneagainst the other in early summer when the days are at theirlongest- give me a good scythe, and take another yourself, and letus see which will fast the longer or mow the stronger, from dawntill dark when the mowing grass is about. Or if you will ploughagainst me, let us each take a yoke of tawny oxen, well-mated and ofgreat strength and endurance: turn me into a four acre field, andsee whether you or I can drive the straighter furrow. If, again, warwere to break out this day, give me a shield, a couple of spears and ahelmet fitting well upon my temples- you would find me foremost in thefray, and would cease your gibes about my belly. You are insolentand cruel, and think yourself a great man because you live in a littleworld, ind that a bad one. If Ulysses comes to his own again, thedoors of his house are wide, but you will find them narrow when youtry to fly through them."
6.  As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered himwith wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the fleshover his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally veryfine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrapabout him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; shealso gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, andfurnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twistedthong for him to sling it over his shoulder.

应用

1.  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."
2.  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
3.  He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:
4、  Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold hisown with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; butamong mortal men- well, there may be another who has as much wealth asI have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled muchand have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years beforeI could get home with my fleet. I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and theEgyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and theErembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they areborn, and the sheep lamb down three times a year. Every one in thatcountry, whether master or man, has plenty of cheese, meat, and goodmilk, for the ewes yield all the year round. But while I wastravelling and getting great riches among these people, my brother wassecretly and shockingly murdered through the perfidy of his wickedwife, so that I have no pleasure in being lord of all this wealth.Whoever your parents may be they must have told you about all this,and of my heavy loss in the ruin of a stately mansion fully andmagnificently furnished. Would that I had only a third of what I nowhave so that I had stayed at home, and all those were living whoperished on the plain of Troy, far from Argos. I of grieve, as I sithere in my house, for one and all of them. At times I cry aloud forsorrow, but presently I leave off again, for crying is cold comfortand one soon tires of it. Yet grieve for these as I may, I do so forone man more than for them all. I cannot even think of him withoutloathing both food and sleep, so miserable does he make me, for no oneof all the Achaeans worked so hard or risked so much as he did. Hetook nothing by it, and has left a legacy of sorrow to myself, forhe has been gone a long time, and we know not whether he is alive ordead. His old father, his long-suffering wife Penelope, and his sonTelemachus, whom he left behind him an infant in arms, are plungedin grief on his account."
5、  And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."

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  • 郭丰宽 08-12

      They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."

  • 胡桃仁 08-12

      "My sons," said he, "make haste to do as I shall bid you. I wishfirst and foremost to propitiate the great goddess Minerva, whomanifested herself visibly to me during yesterday's festivities. Go,then, one or other of you to the plain, tell the stockman to look meout a heifer, and come on here with it at once. Another must go toTelemachus's ship, and invite all the crew, leaving two men only incharge of the vessel. Some one else will run and fetch Laerceus thegoldsmith to gild the horns of the heifer. The rest, stay all of youwhere you are; tell the maids in the house to prepare an excellentdinner, and to fetch seats, and logs of wood for a burnt offering.Tell them also- to bring me some clear spring water."

  • 胡启生 08-12

       At last, however, Ulysses said, "Wife, we have not yet reached theend of our troubles. I have an unknown amount of toil still toundergo. It is long and difficult, but I must go through with it,for thus the shade of Teiresias prophesied concerning me, on the daywhen I went down into Hades to ask about my return and that of mycompanions. But now let us go to bed, that we may lie down and enjoythe blessed boon of sleep."

  • 方雪祥 08-12

      "Eurymachus," answered Ulysses, "if you and I were to work oneagainst the other in early summer when the days are at theirlongest- give me a good scythe, and take another yourself, and letus see which will fast the longer or mow the stronger, from dawntill dark when the mowing grass is about. Or if you will ploughagainst me, let us each take a yoke of tawny oxen, well-mated and ofgreat strength and endurance: turn me into a four acre field, andsee whether you or I can drive the straighter furrow. If, again, warwere to break out this day, give me a shield, a couple of spears and ahelmet fitting well upon my temples- you would find me foremost in thefray, and would cease your gibes about my belly. You are insolentand cruel, and think yourself a great man because you live in a littleworld, ind that a bad one. If Ulysses comes to his own again, thedoors of his house are wide, but you will find them narrow when youtry to fly through them."

  • 陈晓明 08-11

    {  But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.

  • 哈肯贝格 08-10

      "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.}

  • 埃里克·布林约尔松 08-10

      "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."

  • 肖允 08-10

      "Meanwhile Menelaus and I were on our way home from Troy, on goodterms with one another. When we got to Sunium, which is the point ofAthens, Apollo with his painless shafts killed Phrontis thesteersman of Menelaus' ship (and never man knew better how to handle avessel in rough weather) so that he died then and there with thehelm in his hand, and Menelaus, though very anxious to pressforward, had to wait in order to bury his comrade and give him his duefuneral rites. Presently, when he too could put to sea again, andhad sailed on as far as the Malean heads, Jove counselled evil againsthim and made it it blow hard till the waves ran mountains high. Herehe divided his fleet and took the one half towards Crete where theCydonians dwell round about the waters of the river Iardanus. There isa high headland hereabouts stretching out into the sea from a placecalled Gortyn, and all along this part of the coast as far as Phaestusthe sea runs high when there is a south wind blowing, but arterPhaestus the coast is more protected, for a small headland can makea great shelter. Here this part of the fleet was driven on to therocks and wrecked; but the crews just managed to save themselves. Asfor the other five ships, they were taken by winds and seas toEgypt, where Menelaus gathered much gold and substance among people ofan alien speech. Meanwhile Aegisthus here at home plotted his evildeed. For seven years after he had killed Agamemnon he ruled inMycene, and the people were obedient under him, but in the eighth yearOrestes came back from Athens to be his bane, and killed themurderer of his father. Then he celebrated the funeral rites of hismother and of false Aegisthus by a banquet to the people of Argos, andon that very day Menelaus came home, with as much treasure as hisships could carry.

  • 洪裕芸 08-09

       "[The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind gotinto the South again, which frightened me lest I should be takenback to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was whatactually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, andby sunrise had reacfied the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She wasthen sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft towardthe fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. Icould not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for theroots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the wholepool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reachthem; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should dischargemy mast and raft again- and a very long while it seemed. A jurymanis not more glad to get home to supper, after having been longdetained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raftbeginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let gowith my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, bard by my rafton to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla,the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight ofme- otherwise I should have certainly been lost.]

  • 王若飞 08-07

    {  "So they did as I told them; but I said nothing about the awfulmonster Scylla, for I knew the men would not on rowing if I did, butwould huddle together in the hold. In one thing only did I disobeyCirce's strict instructions- I put on my armour. Then seizing twostrong spears I took my stand on the ship Is bows, for it was therethat I expected first to see the monster of the rock, who was to do mymen so much harm; but I could not make her out anywhere, though Istrained my eyes with looking the gloomy rock all over and over

  • 林日耕 08-07

      "And now, O queen, have pity upon me, for you are the first person Ihave met, and I know no one else in this country. Show me the way toyour town, and let me have anything that you may have brought hitherto wrap your clothes in. May heaven grant you in all things yourheart's desire- husband, house, and a happy, peaceful home; forthere is nothing better in this world than that man and wife should beof one mind in a house. It discomfits their enemies, makes thehearts of their friends glad, and they themselves know more about itthan any one."

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