վҳʱ ƾ̨ ۵ Ļ Ƶ֪ʶȨ

Ǯ111µ½:ϰƽ̸ͬ

2020-08-10 08:06:53  Դձ
Ǯ111µ½˻ 

Ǯ111µ½

Ǯ111µ½ַ:a g 9 559 v i p

Poore soule, why live I then?

Ǯ111µ½廭

Worthy Lady, it seemeth to me, that you are so truly wise, as nodoubt you have long since perceived, what unfeigned affection yourbeauty (far excelling) hath compelled me to beare you. Setting asidethose commendable qualities and singular vertues gloriously shining inyou, and powerfull enough to make a conquest of the stoutestcourage, I held it utterly needlesse, to let you understand bywords, how faithfull the love is I bear you, were it not much morefervent and constant, then ever any other man can expresse to a woman.In which condition it shall still continue, without the leastblemish or impayre, so long as I enjoy life or motion; yea, and I dareassure you, that if in the future world, affection may containe thesame powerfull dominion, as it doth in this; I am the man borne tolove you perpetually. Whereby you may rest confidently perswaded, thatyou enjoy not any thing, how poore or precious soever it be, which youcan so solemnely account to be your owne, and in the truest title ofright, as you may my selfe, in all that I have, or for ever shall bemine.

Ricciardo durst not speake one word, but still expressed his affablebehaviour towards her, bestowing infinite embraces and kisses onher: which so much the more augmented her rage and anger, continuingon her chiding thus. If by these flatteries and idle follies, thouhopest to comfort or pacifie me, thou runnest quite by as from thyreckoning; for I shall never imagine my selfe halfe satisfied,untill in the presence of my parents, friends, and neighbours, Ihave revealed thy base behaviour. Tell mee, treacherous man, am notI as faire, as the wife of Ricciardo? Am I not as good a Gentlewomanborne, as shee is? What canst thou more respect in her, then is inmee? Villaine, monster, why doest thou not answere mee? I will send toRicciardo, who loveth mee beyond all other women in Naples, and yetcould never vaunt, that I gave him so much as a friendly looke: heshall know, what a dishonour thou hadst intended towards him; whichboth he and his friends will revenge soundly upon thee. Theexclamations of the Lady were so tedious and irksome, that Ricciardoperceiving, if shee continued longer in these complaints, worsewould ensue thereon, then could bee easily remedied: resolved tomake himselfe knowne unto her, to reclaime her out of this violentextasie, and holding her somewhat strictly, to prevent her escapingfrom him, he said. Madam, afflict your selfe no further, for, what Icould not obtaine by simply loving you, subtilty hath better taughtme, and I am your Ricciardo: which she hearing, and perfectlyknowing him by his voyce; shee would have leapt out of the Bath, butshee could not, and to avoyde her crying out, he layde his hand on hermouth, saying. Lady, what is done, cannot now be undone, albeit youcried out all your life time. If you exclaime, or make this knowneopenly by any meanes; two unavoydable dangers must needes ensuethereon. The one (which you ought more carefully to respect) is thewounding of your good renowne and honour, because, when you shall say,that by treacherie I drew you hither: I will boldly maintaine thecontrary, avouching, that having corrupted you with gold, and notgiving you so much as covetously you desired; you grew offended, andthereon made the outcry, and you are not to learne, that the worldis more easily induced to beleeve the worst, then any goodnesse, be itnever so manifest. Next unto this, mortall hatred must arisebetweene your husband and mee, and (perhaps) I shall as soone killhim, as he me; whereby you can hardly, live in any true contentmentafter. Wherefore, joy of my life, doe not in one moment, both shameyour selfe, and cause such perill betweene your husband and me: foryou are not the first, neither can be the last, that shall bedeceived. I have not beguiled you, to take any honour from you, butonely declared, the faithfull affection I beare you, and so shalldoe for ever, as being your bounden and most obedient servant; andas it is a long time agoe, since I dedicated my selfe and all mineto your service, so hence-forth must I remaine for ever. You arewise enough (I know) in all other things: then shew your selfe notto be silly or simple in this.

Faire Ladies, the paltry Judge of the Marquisate, whereofyesterday I made relation to you; hindred mee then of anotherNovell, concerning silly Calandrino, wherewith I purpose now toacquaint you. And because whatsoever hath already bin spoken of him,tended to no other end but matter of meriment, hee and hiscompanions duly considered; the Novel which I shal now report, keepethwithin the selfesame compasse, and aimeth also at your contentment,according to the scope of imposed variety.

Ǯ111µ½ ɻ

Having brought with him thither three goodly rich garments, whichhad beene given him by sundrie Lords, for his more sightlyappearance at this great meeting; the importunate Host being greedieof payment, first he delivered him one of them, and yet not halfethe score being wiped off, the second must needes follow; andbeside, except he meant to leave his lodging, hee must live upon thethird so long as it would last, till hee saw what end his hopeswould sort too. It fortuned, during the time of living thus upon hislast refuge, that hee met with Maister Can one day at dinner, where hepresented himselfe before him, with a discontented countenance:which Maister Can well observing, more to distaste him, then takedelight in any thing that could come from him, he sayd. Bergamino, howcheerest thou? Thou art very melancholly, I prythee tell us why?Bergamino suddenly, without any premeditation, yet seeming as if hehad long considered thereon, reported this Tale.

During the speeches, an other entred among them, who assuredAniolliero, that Fortarigo was the Thiefe which robde him of hismoney, shewing him also how much hee had lost at the Dice: WherewithAniolliero being much mooved, very angerly reprooved Fortarigo, and,but for feare of the Law, would have offered him outrage, thretning tohave him hangd by the neck, or else condemned to the Gallies belongingto Florence, and so mounted on his horse. Fortarigo making shew to thestanders by, as if Aniolliero menaced some other body, and not him,said. Come Aniolliero, I pray thee let us leave this frivilousprating, for (indeede) it is not worth a Button, and minde a matter ofmore importance: my Doublet will bee had againe for five and thirtyshillings, if the money may bee tendered downe at this very instant,whereas if we deferre it till to morrow, perhaps hee will then havethe whole eight and thirty which he lent me, and he doth me thispleasure, because I am ready (at another time) to affoord him the likecourtesie; why then should we loose three shillings, when they mayso easily be saved.

Ǯ111µ½йҶ ۻ

THE SIXT DAY, THE SIXTH NOVEL

Never speake so faire and flattering to us, for we are movedbeyond all compasse of patience. All misfortunes in the worlde fallupon you, and an evill death may you dye, like the most false andperfidious Traitor living on the earth. We must beate our braines, andmove all our most endeared friends, onely for your honor andadvancement: while wee were well neere starved to death in the coldlike Dogs, and, by your breach of promise, have bin this night soextreamly beaten, as if (like Asses) we should have beene driven toRome.

Geloso, more than halfe mad with anger, first, because hee hadlost his supper: next, having sitten almost all the night (which wasextreamely cold and windle) his Armor much mollesting him, and yethe could see no Friar come: when day drew neere, and hee ashamed towatch there any longer; conveighed himselfe to some more convenientplace, where putting off his Armes, and seeming to come from the placeof his Lodging; about the ninth houre, he found his doore open, entredin, and went up the stayres, going to dinner with his Wife. Within awhile after, according as Geloso had ordred the businesse, a youthcame thither, seeming to be the Novice sent from the Confessor, and hebeing admitted to speake with her, demanded, whether shee weretroubled or mollested that night passed, as formerly she had bin,and whether the partie came or no? The Woman, who knew well enough theMessenger (notwithstanding all his formall disguise) made answer: Thatthe party expected, came not: but if hee had come, it was to nopurpose; because her minde was now otherwise altred, albeit shechanged not a jote from her amorous conclusion.

Ǯ111µ½ͻ

Master Herminio hearing him say so, and expecting no such answeras he had, saide, Good Master Guillaume, tell me what it is, and on myfaith I will have it fairely painted. Whereto Master Guillaumesuddenly replied; Do nothing but this Sir: Paint over the Portall ofyour Halles enterance, the lively picture of Liberality, to bid allyour friends better welcome, then hitherto they have beene. WhenMaster Herminio heard these words, he becam possessed with such asudden shame, that his complexion changed from the former palenesse,and answered thus. Master Guillaume, I will have your advice sotruly figured over my gate, and shee shall give so good welcome to allmy guests, that both you, and all these Gentlemen shall say, I haveboth seene her, and am become reasonably acquainted with her. Fromthat time forward, the words of Master Guillaume were so effectuallwith Signior Herminio, that he became the most bountifull and besthouse-keeper, which lived in his time in Geneway: no man morehonouring and friendly welcoming both strangers and Citizens, thenhe continually used to do.

ƷͼƬǮ111µ½

(ࣺӱӱ)

Ǯ111µ½ר

Ǯ111µ½ƼĶ

Ǯ111µ½2020ͼ׵dz ںϴµ Such Ladies as in Love are bravely bold, ϸ

õľǹҩû| ̵2018|Ѻ̲ǿиο Ƿβֱ

Ǯ111µ½ҽԺECMOɹһ͹״ Thus poore Andrea is still made a property, and Fortune (this fatallnight) will have no other foole but he, as delighting in his hourlydisasters. Feare of their fury makes him obedient, into the grave hegoes, and being within, thus consults with himselfe. These cunningcompanions suppose me to be simple, and make me enter the Tombe,having an absolute intention to deceive me. For, when I have giventhem all the riches that I finde here, and am ready to come forthfor mine equall portion: away will they runne for their owne safety,and leaving me heere, not onely shall I loose my right among them, butmust remaine to what danger may follow after. Having thus meditated,he resolved to make sure of his owne share first, and remembring therich Ring, whereof they had tolde him: forthwith hee tooke it from theArchbishops finger, finding it indifferently fitte for his owne.Afterward, hee tooke the Crosse, Miter, rich garments, Gloves and all,leaving him nothing but his shirt, giving them all these severallparcels, protesting that there was nothing else. Still they pressedupon him, affirming that there was a Ring beside, urging him to searchdiligently for it; yet still he answered, that he could not findeit, and for their longer tarrying with him, seemed as if he serchedvery carefully, but all appeared to no purpose. ϸ

Ǯ111µ½̺¹Ĭ˶11սǰ˹վжΣ| ̵2018|ҽԺ:ECMOɹһ͹״
Ǯ111µ½֥עǮ111µ½΢

΢

΢

ֻ

쵼԰