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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘丽鸽 大小:V5gq0KpF13949KB 下载:uZnYcYZe19691次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:J0gawTcl92710条
日期:2020-08-04 11:29:31
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艾尼瓦尔·图尔迪

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."
2.  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."
3.  BUT as the sun was rising from the fair sea into the firmament ofheaven to shed Blight on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos thecity of Neleus. Now the people of Pylos were gathered on the sea shoreto offer sacrifice of black bulls to Neptune lord of the Earthquake.There were nine guilds with five hundred men in each, and there werenine bulls to each guild. As they were eating the inward meats andburning the thigh bones [on the embers] in the name of Neptune,Telemachus and his crew arrived, furled their sails, brought theirship to anchor, and went ashore.
4.  Then Telemachus went all alone by the sea side, washed his handsin the grey waves, and prayed to Minerva.
5.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.
6.  Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."

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1.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."
2.  And in like manner Eumaeus prayed that Ulysses might return home.
3.  Then she said to her head waiting woman Eurynome, "Bring a seat witha fleece upon it, for the stranger to sit upon while he tells hisstory, and listens to what I have to say. I wish to ask him somequestions."
4.  To this Penelope said, "As long, sir, as you will sit here andtalk to me, I can have no desire to go to bed. Still, people cannot dopermanently without sleep, and heaven has appointed us dwellers onearth a time for all things. I will therefore go upstairs andrecline upon that couch which I have never ceased to flood with mytears from the day Ulysses set out for the city with a hateful name."
5.  "But how, Mentor," replied Telemachus, "dare I go up to Nestor,and how am I to address him? I have never yet been used to holdinglong conversations with people, and am ashamed to begin questioningone who is so much older than myself."
6.  Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, andhow they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan. Marsmade Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, sothe sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan. Vulcan was veryangry when he heard such dreadful news, so he went to his smithybrooding mischief, got his great anvil into its place, and began toforge some chains which none could either unloose or break, so thatthey might stay there in that place. When he had finished his snare hewent into his bedroom and festooned the bed-posts all over with chainslike cobwebs; he also let many hang down from the great beam of theceiling. Not even a god could see them, so fine and subtle werethey. As soon as he had spread the chains all over the bed, he made asthough he were setting out for the fair state of Lemnos, which ofall places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Mars keptno blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to hishouse, burning with love for Venus.

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1.  "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'
2.  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."
3.  "But the cruel wretch said, 'Then I will eat all Noman's comradesbefore Noman himself, and will keep Noman for the last. This is thepresent that I will make him.'
4.  "Nestor son of Neleus," answered Telemachus, "honour to theAchaean name, the Achaeans applaud Orestes and his name will livethrough all time for he has avenged his father nobly. Would thatheaven might grant me to do like vengeance on the insolence of thewicked suitors, who are ill treating me and plotting my ruin; butthe gods have no such happiness in store for me and for my father,so we must bear it as best we may."
5.   On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."
6.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:

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1.  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."
2.  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'
3.  "Happy son of Peleus," answered the ghost of Agamemnon, "forhaving died at Troy far from Argos, while the bravest of the Trojansand the Achaeans fell round you fighting for your body. There youlay in the whirling clouds of dust, all huge and hugely, heedlessnow of your chivalry. We fought the whole of the livelong day, norshould we ever have left off if Jove had not sent a hurricane tostay us. Then, when we had borne you to the ships out of the fray,we laid you on your bed and cleansed your fair skin with warm waterand with ointments. The Danaans tore their hair and wept bitterlyround about you. Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortalnymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing wentforth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear. They wouldhave fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestorwhose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, flynot sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the seawith her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'
4、  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captive. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with horsemen and foot soldiers and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them. Jove, however, put it in my mind to do thus- and Iwish I had died then and there in Egypt instead, for there was muchsorrow in store for me- I took off my helmet and shield and dropped myspear from my hand; then I went straight up to the king's chariot,clasped his knees and kissed them, whereon he spared my life, bademe get into his chariot, and took me weeping to his own home. Manymade at me with their ashen spears and tried to kil me in theirfury, but the king protected me, for he feared the wrath of Jove theprotector of strangers, who punishes those who do evil.
5、  The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at thedoor. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixingwine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed hishead and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could notbe more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his oldage, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after havinggone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over asthough he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:

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  • 杨兴雅 08-03

      "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."

  • 奥特莱斯 08-03

      A dark cloud of sorrow fell upon Laertes as he listened. He filledboth hands with the dust from off the ground and poured it over hisgrey head, groaning heavily as he did so. The heart of Ulysses wastouched, and his nostrils quivered as he looked upon his father;then he sprang towards him, flung his arms about him and kissed him,saying, "I am he, father, about whom you are asking- I have returnedafter having been away for twenty years. But cease your sighing andlamentation- we have no time to lose, for I should tell you that Ihave been killing the suitors in my house, to punish them for theirinsolence and crimes."

  • 熊猫大侠 08-03

       Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run ontrippingly like an old fish-fag. I have a good mind to lay bothhands about you, and knock your teeth out of your head like so manyboar's tusks. Get ready, therefore, and let these people here stand byand look on. You will never be able to fight one who is so muchyounger than yourself."

  • 张卫平 08-03

      "Thus did they speak, but I answered sorrowfully, 'My men haveundone me; they, and cruel sleep, have ruined me. My friends, mendme this mischief, for you can if you will.'

  • 万家福 08-02

    {  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

  • 罗文伟 08-01

      Every one assented, and Ulysses girded his old rags about his loins,thus baring his stalwart thighs, his broad chest and shoulders, andhis mighty arms; but Minerva came up to him and made his limbs evenstronger still. The suitors were beyond measure astonished, and onewould turn towards his neighbour saying, "The stranger has broughtsuch a thigh out of his old rags that there will soon be nothingleft of Irus."}

  • 刘东 08-01

      "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."

  • 耶尔穆 08-01

      BOOK X.

  • 贾福兴 07-31

       "I will tell Penelope," answered Ulysses, "nothing but what isstrictly true. I know all about her husband, and have been partnerwith him in affliction, but I am afraid of passing. through this crowdof cruel suitors, for their pride and insolence reach heaven. Justnow, moreover, as I was going about the house without doing anyharm, a man gave me a blow that hurt me very much, but neitherTelemachus nor any one else defended me. Tell Penelope, therefore,to be patient and wait till sundown. Let her give me a seat close upto the fire, for my clothes are worn very thin- you know they are, foryou have seen them ever since I first asked you to help me- she canthen ask me about the return of her husband."

  • 陶御轩 07-29

    {  When it was time for them to start home, and they were folding theclothes and putting them into the waggon, Minerva began to considerhow Ulysses should wake up and see the handsome girl who was toconduct him to the city of the Phaeacians. The girl, therefore,threw a ball at one of the maids, which missed her and fell intodeep water. On this they all shouted, and the noise they made wokeUlysses, who sat up in his bed of leaves and began to wonder what itmight all be.

  • 叶晓毛 07-29

      "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.

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