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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:尹文娟 大小:TPsIYZag26162KB 下载:3SdEuHx560337次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:eMdZz2du47496条
日期:2020-08-03 17:58:11
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陶汰

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."
2.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
3.  Ulysses made no answer, but bowed his head and brooded. Then a thirdman, Philoetius, joined them, who was bringing in a barren heiferand some goats. These were brought over by the boatmen who are thereto take people over when any one comes to them. So Philoetius made hisheifer and his goats secure under the gatehouse, and then went up tothe swineherd. "Who, Swineherd," said he, "is this stranger that islately come here? Is he one of your men? What is his family? Wheredoes he come from? Poor fellow, he looks as if he had been somegreat man, but the gods give sorrow to whom they will- even to kingsif it so pleases them
4.  "'Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, butwhen he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he wascaught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorelyagainst his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used todwell, but where Aegisthus was then living. By and by, however, itseemed as though he was to return safely after all, for the godsbacked the wind into its old quarter and they reached home; whereonAgamemnon kissed his native soil, and shed tears of joy at findinghimself in his own country.
5.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."
6.  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.

计划指导

1.  Then Telemachus said, "Mother, I am the only man either in Ithaca orin the islands that are over against Elis who has the right to let anyone have the bow or to refuse it. No one shall force me one way or theother, not even though I choose to make the stranger a present ofthe bow outright, and let him take it away with him. Go, then,within the house and busy yourself with your daily duties, yourloom, your distaff, and the ordering of your servants. This bow is aman's matter, and mine above all others, for it is I who am masterhere."
2.  Ulysses again glared at him and said, "Though you should give me allthat you have in the world both now and all that you ever shallhave, I will not stay my hand till I have paid all of you in full. Youmust fight, or fly for your lives; and fly, not a man of you shall."
3.  "I was not there," answered Euryclea, "and do not know; I only heardthem groaning while they were being killed. We sat crouching andhuddled up in a corner of the women's room with the doors closed, tillyour son came to fetch me because his father sent him. Then I foundUlysses standing over the corpses that were lying on the ground allround him, one on top of the other. You would have enjoyed it if youcould have seen him standing there all bespattered with blood andfilth, and looking just like a lion. But the corpses are now all piledup in the gatehouse that is in the outer court, and Ulysses has lita great fire to purify the house with sulphur. He has sent me tocall you, so come with me that you may both be happy together afterall; for now at last the desire of your heart has been fulfilled; yourhusband is come home to find both wife and son alive and well, andto take his revenge in his own house on the suitors who behaved sobadly to him."
4.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, he againlit his fire, milked his goats and ewes, all quite rightly, and thenlet each have her own young one; as soon as he had got through withall his work, he clutched up two more of my men, and began eating themfor his morning's meal. Presently, with the utmost ease, he rolled thestone away from the door and drove out his sheep, but he at once putit back again- as easily as though he were merely clapping the lidon to a quiver full of arrows. As soon as he had done so he shouted,and cried 'Shoo, shoo,' after his sheep to drive them on to themountain; so I was left to scheme some way of taking my revenge andcovering myself with glory.
5.  She cried aloud as she spoke, and the goddess heard her prayer;meanwhile the suitors were clamorous throughout the coveredcloister, and one of them said:
6.  On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."

推荐功能

1.  With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.
2.  "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."
3.  "Telemachus," said one youngster, "means to be the death of us; Isuppose he thinks he can bring friends to help him from Pylos, oragain from Sparta, where he seems bent on going. Or will he go toEphyra as well, for poison to put in our wine and kill us?"
4.  "Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son byhim, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaecians.Nausithous had two sons Rhexenor and Alcinous; Apollo killed the firstof them while he was still a bridegroom and without male issue; but heleft a daughter Arete, whom Alcinous married, and honours as noother woman is honoured of all those that keep house along withtheir husbands.
5.   Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
6.  Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

应用

1.  Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold hisown with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; butamong mortal men- well, there may be another who has as much wealth asI have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled muchand have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years beforeI could get home with my fleet. I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and theEgyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and theErembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they areborn, and the sheep lamb down three times a year. Every one in thatcountry, whether master or man, has plenty of cheese, meat, and goodmilk, for the ewes yield all the year round. But while I wastravelling and getting great riches among these people, my brother wassecretly and shockingly murdered through the perfidy of his wickedwife, so that I have no pleasure in being lord of all this wealth.Whoever your parents may be they must have told you about all this,and of my heavy loss in the ruin of a stately mansion fully andmagnificently furnished. Would that I had only a third of what I nowhave so that I had stayed at home, and all those were living whoperished on the plain of Troy, far from Argos. I of grieve, as I sithere in my house, for one and all of them. At times I cry aloud forsorrow, but presently I leave off again, for crying is cold comfortand one soon tires of it. Yet grieve for these as I may, I do so forone man more than for them all. I cannot even think of him withoutloathing both food and sleep, so miserable does he make me, for no oneof all the Achaeans worked so hard or risked so much as he did. Hetook nothing by it, and has left a legacy of sorrow to myself, forhe has been gone a long time, and we know not whether he is alive ordead. His old father, his long-suffering wife Penelope, and his sonTelemachus, whom he left behind him an infant in arms, are plungedin grief on his account."
2.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
3.  As he spoke he threw his shabby old tattered wallet over hisshoulders, by the cord from which it hung, and Eumaeus gave him astick to his liking. The two then started, leaving the station incharge of the dogs and herdsmen who remained behind; the swineherd ledthe way and his master followed after, looking like some broken-downold tramp as he leaned upon his staff, and his clothes were all inrags. When they had got over the rough steep ground and were nearingthe city, they reached the fountain from which the citizens drew theirwater. This had been made by Ithacus, Neritus, and Polyctor. There wasa grove of water-loving poplars planted in a circle all round it,and the clear cold water came down to it from a rock high up, whileabove the fountain there was an altar to the nymphs, at which allwayfarers used to sacrifice. Here Melanthius son of Dolius overtookthem as he was driving down some goats, the best in his flock, for thesuitors' dinner, and there were two shepherds with him. When he sawEumaeus and Ulysses he reviled them with outrageous and unseemlylanguage, which made Ulysses very angry.
4、  "Sir, and all of you, farewell. Make your drink-offerings and sendme on my way rejoicing, for you have fulfilled my heart's desire bygiving me an escort, and making me presents, which heaven grant that Imay turn to good account; may I find my admirable wife living in peaceamong friends, and may you whom I leave behind me give satisfaction toyour wives and children; may heaven vouchsafe you every good grace,and may no evil thing come among your people."
5、  "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'

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网友评论(TfoIa6Uv23478))

  • 鲍勃-佛古森 08-02

      This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."

  • 陶德 08-02

      Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.

  • 林劲榆 08-02

       This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."

  • 赵海建 08-02

      Alcinous then led the way, and the others followed after, while aservant went to fetch Demodocus. The fifty-two picked oarsmen wentto the sea shore as they had been told, and when they got there theydrew the ship into the water, got her mast and sails inside her, boundthe oars to the thole-pins with twisted thongs of leather, all indue course, and spread the white sails aloft. They moored the vessel alittle way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the houseof King Alcinous. The outhouses, yards, and all the precincts werefilled with crowds of men in great multitudes both old and young;and Alcinous killed them a dozen sheep, eight full grown pigs, and twooxen. These they skinned and dressed so as to provide a magnificentbanquet.

  • 金永浩 08-01

    {  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."

  • 巴尔扎伊 07-31

      "It shall not be so, Eurymachus," said Antinous, "and you know ityourself. To-day is the feast of Apollo throughout all the land; whocan string a bow on such a day as this? Put it on one side- as for theaxes they can stay where they are, for no one is likely to come to thehouse and take them away: let the cupbearer go round with his cups,that we may make our drink-offerings and drop this matter of thebow; we will tell Melanthius to bring us in some goats to-morrow-the best he has; we can then offer thigh bones to Apollo the mightyarcher, and again make trial of the bow, so as to bring the contest toan end."}

  • 陈爱萍 07-31

      "Next to her I saw Antiope, daughter to Asopus, who could boast ofhaving slept in the arms of even Jove himself, and who bore him twosons Amphion and Zethus. These founded Thebes with its seven gates,and built a wall all round it; for strong though they were theycould not hold Thebes till they had walled it.

  • 刘晓春 07-31

      Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

  • 梁秀鸾 07-30

       "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 保罗·瓦伊·波伊 07-28

    {  Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,

  • 徐振礼 07-28

      The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."

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