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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:宁维卫 大小:OOrsAu1Z85642KB 下载:ZbTWzx0l56390次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Dyo4rLpr29932条
日期:2020-08-07 10:14:38
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'
2.  It was not long ere Penelope came to know what the suitors wereplotting; for a man servant, Medon, overheard them from outside theouter court as they were laying their schemes within, and went to tellhis mistress. As he crossed the threshold of her room Penelope said:"Medon, what have the suitors sent you here for? Is it to tell themaids to leave their master's business and cook dinner for them? Iwish they may neither woo nor dine henceforward, neither here noranywhere else, but let this be the very last time, for the waste youall make of my son's estate. Did not your fathers tell you when youwere children how good Ulysses had been to them- never doinganything high-handed, nor speaking harshly to anybody? Kings may saythings sometimes, and they may take a fancy to one man and dislikeanother, but Ulysses never did an unjust thing by anybody- which showswhat bad hearts you have, and that there is no such thing as gratitudeleft in this world."
3.  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
4.  "'Keep still,' said he in a low voice, 'or the others will hearyou.' Then he raised his head on his elbow.
5.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
6.  "I do not know," answered Medon, "whether some god set him on to it,or whether he went on his own impulse to see if he could find out ifhis father was dead, or alive and on his way home."

计划指导

1.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."
2.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked thefleet horses to the chariot. The housekeeper packed them up aprovision of bread, wine, and sweetmeats fit for the sons ofprinces. Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratusgathered up the reins and took his seat beside him. He lashed thehorses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country,leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them. All that day did theytravel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down anddarkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae where Diocleslived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus. Here theypassed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn; appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and drove out through the gateway under the echoinggatehouse. Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forwardnothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands Of the opencountry, and in the course of time completed their journey, so welldid their steeds take them.
3.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.
4.  "'We went,' said he, as you told us, through the forest, and inthe middle of it there was a fine house built with cut stones in aplace that could be seen from far. There we found a woman, or else shewas a goddess, working at her loom and singing sweetly; so the menshouted to her and called her, whereon she at once came down, openedthe door, and invited us in. The others did not suspect any mischiefso they followed her into the house, but I stayed where I was, for Ithought there might be some treachery. From that moment I saw themno more, for not one of them ever came out, though I sat a long timewatching for them.'
5.  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.
6.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'

推荐功能

1.  On this Telemachus strode off through the yards, brooding hisrevenge upon the When he reached home he stood his spear against abearing-post of the cloister, crossed the stone floor of thecloister itself, and went inside.
2.  The suitors now aimed a second time, but again Minerva made theirweapons for the most part without effect. One hit a bearing-post ofthe cloister; another went against the door; while the pointed shaftof another struck the wall. Still, Amphimedon just took a piece of thetop skin from off Telemachus's wrist, and Ctesippus managed to grazeEumaeus's shoulder above his shield; but the spear went on and fell tothe ground. Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd ofsuitors. Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and EumaeusPolybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast, andtaunted him saying, "Foul-mouthed son of Polytherses, do not be sofoolish as to talk wickedly another time, but let heaven direct yourspeech, for the gods are far stronger than men. I make you a presentof this advice to repay you for the foot which you gave Ulysses whenhe was begging about in his own house."
3.  "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
4.  "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'
5.   So Eumaeus went up to him and said, "Stranger, Telemachus sendsyou this, and says you are to go the round of the suitors begging, forbeggars must not be shamefaced."
6.  And the vision said, "I shall not tell you for certain whether he isalive or dead, and there is no use in idle conversation."

应用

1.  "King Apollo," answered Mercury, "I only wish I might get thechance, though there were three times as many chains- and you mightlook on, all of you, gods and goddesses, but would sleep with her if Icould."
2.  Thus did he speak, and his saying pleased them well, so Mulius ofDulichium, servant to Amphinomus, mixed them a bowl of wine andwater and handed it round to each of them man by man, whereon theymade their drink-offerings to the blessed gods: Then, when they hadmade their drink-offerings and had drunk each one as he was minded,they took their several ways each of them to his own abode.
3.  With these words he made a drink-offering, and when he had drunkhe put the gold cup again into the hands of Amphinomus, who walkedaway serious and bowing his head, for he foreboded evil. But even sohe did not escape destruction, for Minerva had doomed him fall bythe hand of Telemachus. So he took his seat again at the place fromwhich he had come.
4、  On this Eumaeus took his seat again, and when he had finished hisdinner he left the courts and the cloister with the men at table,and went back to his pigs. As for the suitors, they presently began toamuse themselves with singing and dancing, for it was now getting ontowards evening.
5、  Now when Laertes and the others had done dinner, Ulysses began bysaying, "Some of you go out and see if they are not getting close upto us." So one of Dolius's sons went as he was bid. Standing on thethreshold he could see them all quite near, and said to Ulysses, "Herethey are, let us put on our armour at once."

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网友评论(GgrZGUri39226))

  • 比克斯坦 08-06

      "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'

  • 李繁华 08-06

      Ulysses was glad at finding himself, as Minerva told him, in his owncountry, and he began to answer, but he did not speak the truth, andmade up a lying story in the instinctive wiliness of his heart.

  • 方燕 08-06

       "All that you have said is true," answered Euryclea, "but let mebring you some clean clothes- a shirt and cloak. Do not keep theserags on your back any longer. It is not right."

  • 周斌 08-06

      "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'

  • 艾克 08-05

    {  "Stockman," answered Ulysses, "you seem to be a very well-disposedperson, and I can see that you are a man of sense. Therefore I willtell you, and will confirm my words with an oath: by Jove, the chiefof all gods, and by that hearth of Ulysses to which I am now come,Ulysses shall return before you leave this place, and if you are sominded you shall see him killing the suitors who are now mastershere."

  • 公明堂 08-04

      On this Minerva said, "Telemachus, what are you talking about?Heaven has a long arm if it is minded to save a man; and if it wereme, I should not care how much I suffered before getting home,provided I could be safe when I was once there. I would rather this,than get home quickly, and then be killed in my own house as Agamemnonwas by the treachery of Aegisthus and his wife. Still, death iscertain, and when a man's hour is come, not even the gods can savehim, no matter how fond they are of him."}

  • 蔡溪根 08-04

      "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."

  • 艾米-波勒 08-04

      BOOK VI.

  • 周大生 08-03

       "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.

  • 王沧江 08-01

    {  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."

  • 侯麦 08-01

      And Ulysses answered, "In good truth, goddess, it seems I shouldhave come to much the same bad end in my own house as Agamemnon did,if you had not given me such timely information. Advise me how I shallbest avenge myself. Stand by my side and put your courage into myheart as on the day when we loosed Troy's fair diadem from her brow.Help me now as you did then, and I will fight three hundred men, ifyou, goddess, will be with me."

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