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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蔡有丰 大小:PK6ChKei30536KB 下载:VnPOxIFm17855次
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日期:2020-08-15 03:55:16
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Penelope heard what he was saying and scolded the maid, "Impudentbaggage, said she, "I see how abominably you are behaving, and youshall smart for it. You knew perfectly well, for I told you myself,that I was going to see the stranger and ask him about my husband, forwhose sake I am in such continual sorrow."
2.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:
3.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'
4.  Then he said to his friend Piraeus, "Piraeus, son of Clytius, youhave throughout shown yourself the most willing to serve me of allthose who have accompanied me to Pylos; I wish you would take thisstranger to your own house and entertain him hospitably till I cancome for him."
5.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
6.  "Nurse, draw me off some of the best wine you have, after what youare keeping for my father's own drinking, in case, poor man, he shouldescape death, and find his way home again after all. Let me havetwelve jars, and see that they all have lids; also fill me somewell-sewn leathern bags with barley meal- about twenty measures inall. Get these things put together at once, and say nothing aboutit. I will take everything away this evening as soon as my motherhas gone upstairs for the night. I am going to Sparta and to Pylosto see if I can hear anything about the return of my dear father.

计划指导

1.  "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."
2.  Ulysses answered, "I see that you are of an unbelieving mind; I havegiven you my oath, and yet you will not credit me; let us then makea bargain, and call all the gods in heaven to witness it. If yourmaster comes home, give me a cloak and shirt of good wear, and send meto Dulichium where I want to go; but if he does not come as I say hewill, set your men on to me, and tell them to throw me from yonderprecepice, as a warning to tramps not to go about the countrytelling lies."
3.  "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'
4.  BOOK XV.
5.  "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.
6.  To this Penelope said, "My dear sir, of all the guests who everyet came to my house there never was one who spoke in all thingswith such admirable propriety as you do. There happens to be in thehouse a most respectable old woman- the same who received my poor dearhusband in her arms the night he was born, and nursed him ininfancy. She is very feeble now, but she shall wash your feet.""Come here," said she, "Euryclea, and wash your master's age-mate; Isuppose Ulysses' hands and feet are very much the same now as his are,for trouble ages all of us dreadfully fast."

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1.  "I had hardly finished telling everything to the men before wereached the island of the two Sirens, for the wind had been veryfavourable. Then all of a sudden it fell dead calm; there was not abreath of wind nor a ripple upon the water, so the men furled thesails and stowed them; then taking to their oars they whitened thewater with the foam they raised in rowing. Meanwhile I look a largewheel of wax and cut it up small with my sword. Then I kneaded the waxin my strong hands till it became soft, which it soon did betweenthe kneading and the rays of the sun-god son of Hyperion. Then Istopped the ears of all my men, and they bound me hands and feet tothe mast as I stood upright on the crosspiece; but they went on rowingthemselves. When we had got within earshot of the land, and the shipwas going at a good rate, the Sirens saw that we were getting in shoreand began with their singing.
2.  Then Amphinomus drew his sword and made straight at Ulysses to tryand get him away from the door; but Telemachus was too quick forhim, and struck him from behind; the spear caught him between theshoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell heavily tothe ground and struck the earth with his forehead. Then Telemachussprang away from him, leaving his spear still in the body, for hefeared that if he stayed to draw it out, some one of the Achaeansmight come up and hack at him with his sword, or knock him down, so heset off at a run, and immediately was at his father's side. Then hesaid:
3.  Therewith she went down into the cave to look for the safesthiding places, while Ulysses brought up all the treasure of gold,bronze, and good clothing which the Phaecians had given him. Theystowed everything carefully away, and Minerva set a stone againstthe door of the cave. Then the two sat down by the root of the greatolive, and consulted how to compass the destruction of the wickedsuitors.
4.  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.
5.   Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
6.  "Those whom you have named," answered Telemachus, "are a couple ofgood allies, for though they dwell high up among the clouds theyhave power over both gods and men."

应用

1.  "Eumaeus, this house of Ulysses is a very fine place. No matterhow far you go you will find few like it. One building keeps followingon after another. The outer court has a wall with battlements allround it; the doors are double folding, and of good workmanship; itwould be a hard matter to take it by force of arms. I perceive, too,that there are many people banqueting within it, for there is asmell of roast meat, and I hear a sound of music, which the godshave made to go along with feasting."
2.  Menelaus was very angry and said, "Eteoneus, son of Boethous, younever used to be a fool, but now you talk like a simpleton. Take theirhorses out, of course, and show the strangers in that they may havesupper; you and I have stayed often enough at other people's housesbefore we got back here, where heaven grant that we may rest inpeace henceforward."
3.  BOOK XIII.
4、  "Hear me," said he, "aldermen and town councillors of thePhaeacians, that I may speak even as I am minded. This stranger,whoever he may be, has found his way to my house from somewhere orother either East or West. He wants an escort and wishes to have thematter settled. Let us then get one ready for him, as we have done forothers before him; indeed, no one who ever yet came to my house hasbeen able to complain of me for not speeding on his way soon enough.Let us draw a ship into the sea- one that has never yet made a voyage-and man her with two and fifty of our smartest young sailors. Thenwhen you have made fast your oars each by his own seat, leave the shipand come to my house to prepare a feast. I will find you ineverything. I am giving will these instructions to the young men whowill form the crew, for as regards you aldermen and towncouncillors, you will join me in entertaining our guest in thecloisters. I can take no excuses, and we will have Demodocus to singto us; for there is no bard like him whatever he may choose to singabout."
5、  But Theoclymenus said, "Eurymachus, you need not send any one withme. I have eyes, ears, and a pair of feet of my own, to say nothing ofan understanding mind. I will take these out of the house with me, forI see mischief overhanging you, from which not one of you men whoare insulting people and plotting ill deeds in the house of Ulysseswill be able to escape."

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  • 舒均倪 08-14

      With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:

  • 伊娃·木马 08-14

      "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"

  • 姚经理 08-14

       "'Say not a word,' he answered, 'in death's favour; I would ratherbe a paid servant in a poor man's house and be above ground thanking of kings among the dead. But give me news about son; is he goneto the wars and will he be a great soldier, or is this not so? Tell mealso if you have heard anything about my father Peleus- does hestill rule among the Myrmidons, or do they show him no respectthroughout Hellas and Phthia now that he is old and his limbs failhim? Could I but stand by his side, in the light of day, with the samestrength that I had when I killed the bravest of our foes upon theplain of Troy- could I but be as I then was and go even for a shorttime to my father's house, any one who tried to do him violence orsupersede him would soon me it.'

  • 半泽直美 08-14

      Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."

  • 罗坪 08-13

    {  Then Telemachus went all alone by the sea side, washed his handsin the grey waves, and prayed to Minerva.

  • 姜广福 08-12

      On this Asphalion, one of the servants, poured water over theirhands and they laid their hands on the good things that were beforethem.}

  • 孙世刚 08-12

      Then nurse Euryclea said, "My child, what are you talking about? butyou were all hard of belief and have made up your mind that yourhusband is never coming, although he is in the house and by his ownfire side at this very moment. Besides I can give you another proof;when I was washing him I perceived the scar which the wild boar gavehim, and I wanted to tell you about it, but in his wisdom he would notlet me, and clapped his hands over my mouth; so come with me and Iwill make this bargain with you- if I am deceiving you, you may haveme killed by the most cruel death you can think of."

  • 许立田 08-12

      "As for myself I kept on puzzling to think how I could best savemy own life and those of my companions; I schemed and schemed, asone who knows that his life depends upon it, for the danger was verygreat. In the end I deemed that this plan would be the best. Themale sheep were well grown, and carried a heavy black fleece, so Ibound them noiselessly in threes together, with some of the withies onwhich the wicked monster used to sleep. There was to be a man underthe middle sheep, and the two on either side were to cover him, sothat there were three sheep to each man. As for myself there was a ramfiner than any of the others, so I caught hold of him by the back,esconced myself in the thick wool under his belly, and flung onpatiently to his fleece, face upwards, keeping a firm hold on it allthe time.

  • 王仕龙 08-11

       The others assented, so they went inside and laid their cloaks onthe benches and seats. They sacrificed the sheep, goats, pigs, and theheifer, and when the inward meats were cooked they served themround. They mixed the wine in the mixing-bowls, and the swineherd gaveevery man his cup, while Philoetius handed round the bread in thebreadbaskets, and Melanthius poured them out their wine. Then theylaid their hands upon the good things that were before them.

  • 玛尔艾力·玉热斯坦 08-09

    {  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'

  • 周清久 08-09

      "And I said, 'Achilles, son of Peleus, foremost champion of theAchaeans, I came to consult Teiresias, and see if he could advise meabout my return home to Ithaca, for I have never yet been able toget near the Achaean land, nor to set foot in my own country, but havebeen in trouble all the time. As for you, Achilles, no one was everyet so fortunate as you have been, nor ever will be, for you wereadored by all us Argives as long as you were alive, and now that youare here you are a great prince among the dead. Do not, therefore,take it so much to heart even if you are dead.'

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