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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:叶祯 大小:lvZN8Rfq41960KB 下载:gZdweyOe61773次
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日期:2020-08-11 09:08:37
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卡布奇诺

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Wherein, you have not onely performed more then I could wish, upon asubject so sutable to my minde: but in every Novell, such variety ofexcellent matter, such singular illustrations, and delicateeloquence hath flowne from you all; as I am utterly unable to inventany thing (notwithstanding the most curious search of my braine) aptor fit for the purpose, to paragon the meanest of them alreadyrelated. And therefore seeing I must needs sinne in the Lawestablished by my selfe; I tender my submission, as worthy ofpunishment, or what amends else you please to enjoyne mee. Now, asreturned to my wonted priviledge, I say, that the Novell recountedby Madame Eliza, of the Fryar Godfather and his Gossip Agnesia, asalso the sottishnesse of the Senese her Husband, hath wrought in me(worthy Ladies) to such effect; as, forbearing to speake any more ofthese wily prancks, which witty wives exercise on their simpleHusbands; I am to tell you a pretty short Tale; which, though there ismatter enough in it, not worthy the crediting, yet partly it willbee pleasing to heare.
2.  When it was day, and all in the house risen, the hoast began tosmile at Panuccio, mocking him with his idle dreaming and talking inthe night.
3.  Massetto, falling in talke with the honest poore man, whose name wasLurco, demanded of him what services hee had done in the Monasterie,having continued there so long a time? Quoth Lurco, I laboured inthe Garden, which is very faire and great; then I went to the Forestto fetch home wood, and cleft it for their Chamber fuell, drawing upall theyr water beside, with many other toilsome services else: butthe allowance of my wages was so little, as it would not pay for theshoes I wore. And that which was worst of all, they being all women, Ithinke the divel dwels among g them, for a man cannot doe any thing toplease them. When I have bene busie at my worke in the garden, onewould come and say, Put this heere, put that there; and others wouldtake the dibble out of my hand, telling me, that I did not performeany thing well, making me so weary of their continuall trifling, asI have lefte all busines, given over the Garden, and what for onemollestation, as also many other; I intended to tarry no longer there,but came away, as thou seest. And yet the Factotum desired me at mydeparting, that if I knew any one who would undertake the aforesaidlabours, I should send him thither, as (indeed) I promised to do:but let mee fall sicke and dye, before I helpe to send them any.
4.  Certaldo, as (perhaps) you know, or have heard, is a Village inthe Vale of Elsa, and under the authority and commaund of ourFlorence, which although it be but small: yet (in former times) ithath bin inhabited with Gentlemen, and people of especiall respect.A religious Friar of S. Anthonies Order, named Friar Onyon, had longtime used to resort thither, to receive the benevolent almes, whichthose charitably affected people in simplicity gave him, and chieflyat divers daies of the year, when their bounty and devotion wouldextend themselves more largely then at other seasons. And so muchthe rather, because they thought him to be a good Pastor of holylife in outward appearance, and carried a name of much greater matter,then remained in the man indeed; beside, that part of the countryyeilded far more plentifull abundance of Onyons, then all other inTuscany elsewhere, a kinde of foode greatly affected by thoseFriars, as men alwaies of hungry and good appetite. This Friar Onyonwas a man of litle stature red haire, a chearfull countenance, and theworld afforded not a more crafty companion, then he. Moreover,albeit he had very little knowledge or learning, yet he was so prompt,ready and voluble of speech, uttering often he knew not what himselfe:that such as were not wel acquainted with his qualities, supposedhim to be a singular Rhetoritian, excelling Cicero or Quintilianthemselves; and he was a gossip, friend, or deerely affected, by everyone dwelling in those parts. According to his wonted custome, one timehe went thither in the month of August, and on a Sunday morning,when all the dwellers thereabout, were present to heare Masse, andin the chiefest Church above all the rest: when the Friar saw timeconvenient for his purpose, he advanced himselfe, and began tospeake in this manner.
5.  So the Magnifico ceasing, with teares streaming from his eyes, andsighes breaking from his heart, hee sate still in expectation of theLadies answere, who made neither long or short of the matter,neither Tilts nor Tourneying, nor many lost mornings and evenings, norinfinite other such like Offices, which the Magnifico (for her sake)from time to time had spent in vaine, without the least shew ofacceptation, or any hope at all to winne her love: mooved now inthis very houre, by these solemne is protestations, or rather mostprevailing asseverations, she began to finde that in her, which(before) she never felt, namely Love. And although (to keepe herpromise made to her husband) shee spake not a word: yet her heartheaving, her soule throbbing, sighes intermixing, and complexionaltering, could not hide her intended answer to the Magnifico, ifpromise had beene no hinderance to her will. All this while theMagnifico sate as mute as she, and seeing she would not give him anyanswere at all, he could not choose but wonder thereat, yet atlength perceived, that it was thus cunningly contrived by her husband.Notwithstanding, observing well her countenance, that it was in aquite contrary temper, another kinde of fire sparkling in her eye,other humours flowing, her pulses strongly beating, her stomackerising, and sighes swelling, all these were arguments of a change, andmotives to advance his hope. Taking courage by this ticklishperswasion, and instructing his mind with a new kinde of counsell;he would needes answer himselfe on her behalfe, and as if she haduttered the words, thus he spake.
6.  THE INSULTING TYRANTS OVER HUMANE LIFE.

计划指导

1.  At last, looking round about, and seeing his Faulcon standing on herpearch, which he felt to be very plumpe and fat, being voyde of allother helpes in his neede, and thinking her to be a Fowle meete for soNoble a Lady to feede on: without any further demurring or delay, hepluckt off her necke, and caused the poore woman presently to pull herFeathers: which being done, he put her on the spit, and in shorttime she was daintily roasted. Himselfe covered the Table, set breadand salt on and laid the Napkins, whereof he had but a few left him.Going then with chearfull lookes into the Garden, telling the Ladythat dinner was ready, and nothing now wanted, but her presence. Shee,and the Gentlewoman went in, and being sated at the Table, not knowingwhat they fed on, the Faulcon was all their foode; and Frederigo not alittle joyfull, that his credite was so well saved. When they wererisen from the table, and had spent some small time in familiarconference: the Lady thought it fit, to acquaint him with the reasonof her comming thither, and therefore (in very kinde manner) thusbegan.
2.  Under the Peach-tree stands alone,
3.  This Song gave occasion to the whole Company, to imagine, thatsome new and pleasing apprehension of Love, constrained MadamePhilomena to sing in this manner. And because (by the discoursethereof) it plainely appeared, that shee had felt more then sheesaw, shee was so much the more happy, and the like was wished by allthe rest. Wherefore, after the Song was ended; the Queeneremembring, that the next day following was Friday, turning herselfe graciously to them all, thus she spake.
4.  At such time as Thorello thought it convenient, to approve how farrehe was falne out of her remembrance; he took the ring which she gavehim at his departure, and calling a young Page that waited on none butthe Bride, said to him in Italian: Faire youth, goe to the Bride,and saluting her from me, tell her, it is a custome observed in myCountry, that when any Stranger (as I am heere) sitteth before a newmarried Bride, as now shee is, in signe that hee is welcome to herfeast, she sendeth the same Cup (wherein she drinketh her selfe)full of the best wine, and when the stranger hath drunke so much ashim pleaseth, the Bride then pledgeth him with all the rest. ThePage delivered the message to the Bride, who, being a woman ofhonourable disposition, and reputing him to be a Noble Gentleman, totestifie that his presence there was very acceptable to her, sheecommanded a faire Cuppe of gold (which stood directlie before her)to bee neately washed, and when it was filled with excellent Wine,caused it to bee carried to the stranger, and so it was done.
5.  But frailtie in our feminine sex is too much prevalent, and makes uswander from vertuous courses, when we are wel onward in the way tothem. Madam Beatrix, whatsoever passed betweene her and Anichino, Iknow not, but, either to continue this new begunne league forfurther time, or, to be revenged on her husbands implicity, inover-rashlie giving credit to so smooth a ly; this was her advise tohim. Anichino, quoth she, Take a good Cudgell in thy hand, then gointo the Garden so farre as the Pine; and there, as if formerly thouhadst solicited mee unto this secret meeting, only but by way ofapproving my honestie: in my name, revile thy master so bitterly asthou canst, bestowing manie sound blowes on him with thy cudgel; yeturge the shame stil (as it were) to mee, and never leave him, til thouhast beaten him out of the garden, to teach him keepe his bedanother time Such an apt Scholler as Anichino was in this kind,needs no tutoring, but a word is enough to a ready Wit. To theGarden goes he, with a good willow cudgell in his hand, and commingneere to the Pine-tree, there he found Egano disguised like to hisLady, who arising from the place where he sate, went with chearefullgesture to welcome him; but Anichino (in rough and stearne manner)thus spake unto him. Wicked shamelesse, and most immodest Woman, Artthou come, according to thine unchaste and lascivious promise?Couldest thou so easily credite, (though I tempted thee, to trie thevertue of thy continencie) I would offer such a damnable wrong to myworthy Master, that so deerely loves me, and reposeth his especiallconfidence in me? Thou art much deceived in me, and shalt finde,that I hate to be false to him.
6.  Blest were those happy dayes:

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1.  Afterward, having recovered the Princesse dead body out of theSea, and enbalmed it with sighes and teares: he returned backe intoSicilie, where he caused it to be most honourably buried, in alittle Island, named Ustica, face to face confronting Trapanum. TheKing of Thunis hearing these disastrous Newes, sent his Ambassadors(habited in sad mourning) to the aged King of Sicilie, complainingof his faith broken with him, and how the accident had falne out.Age being sodainly incited to anger, and the King extreamly offendedat this injury, seeing no way whereby to deny him justice, it beingurged so instantly by the Ambassadors: caused Gerbino to beapprehended, and he himselfe (in regard that none of his Lords andBarons would therein assist him, but laboured to divert him by theirearnest importunity) pronounced the sentence of death on the Prince,and commanded to have him beheaded in his presence; affectingrather, to dye without an heire, then to be thought a King voyde ofjustice. So these two unfortunate Lovers, never enjoyed the very leastbenefite of their long wished desires: ended both their lives inviolent manner.
2.  Madam, I doe not remember, that ever I sustained any losse orhinderance by you, but rather so much good, as if I was worth anything, it proceeded from your great deservings, and by the servicein which I did stand engaged to you. But my present happinesse canno way be equalled, derived from your super-abounding gracious favour,and more then common course of kindnesse, vouchsafing (of your owneliberall nature) to come and visit so poore a servant. Oh that I hadas much to spend againe, as heretofore riotously I have runnethorow: what a welcome would your poore Host bestow upon you, forgracing; this homely house with your divine presence? With thesewordes, he conducted her into his house, and then into his simpleGarden, where having no convenient company for her, he said. Madam,the poverty of this place is such, that it affoordeth none fit foryour conversation: this poore woman, wife to an honest Husbandman willattend on you, while I (with some speede) shall make ready dinner.
3.  Having found out the place where she dwelt, he began (as it is thecustome of yong Lovers) to use divers daily walkes by her doore: asthinking in his minde, that her remembrance of him was constantlycontinued, as his was most intirely fixed on her. But the case wasvery strangely altred, because she was now growne no more mindfullof him, then if she had never seene him before. Or if she did anyway remember him, it appeared to be so little, that manifest signesdeclared the contrary. Which Jeronimo very quickely perceived,albeit not without many melancholly perturbations. Notwithstanding, helaboured by all possible meanes, to recover her former kindnesseagaine: but finding all his paines frivolously employed; he resolvedto dye, and yet to compasse some speech with her before.
4.  This devise was highly pleasing both to Roberto and Simonida,being the intelligencer of their often meeting, and many times alsoadvising the contrary. But in the end, as the quaintest cunning mayfaile at one time or other; so it fortuned one night, that Simonidabeing in a sound sleepe, and Arriguccio waking, because his drowsiehoure was not yet come: as he extendeth forth his legge in the bed, hefound the thred, which feeling in his hand, and perceiving it was tyedto his wives great toe; it prooved apt tinder to kindle furtherjealousie, and now hee suspected some treachery indeede, and so muchthe rather because the thred guided (under the cloathes) from thebed to the window, and there hanging downe into the streete, as awarning to some further businesse.
5.   Ah Antigonus, me thinkes when I looke on thee, I seeme to beholdmy royall Father, and therefore mooved with the like religious zealeand charitable love, as in duty I owe unto him: I wil make known tothee, what I rather ought to conceale and hide from any person living.I know thee to be honourable, discreete, and truely wise, though Iam a fraile, simple, and weake woman, therefore I dare discover tothee, rather then any other that I know, by what strange andunexpected misfortunes I have lived so long obscurely in the world.And if in thy great and grave judgement (after the hearing of mymany miseries) thou canst any way restore me to my former estate, Ipray thee do it: but if thou perceive it impossible to be done, asearnestly likewise I entreate thee, never to reveale to any livingperson, that either thou hast seene mee, or heard any speech of me.After these words, the teares still streaming from her faire eyes, sherecounted the whole passage of her rare mishappes, even from hershipwracke in the sea of Majorica, untill that very instant houre;speaking them in such harsh manner as they hapned, and not sparing anyjot of them.
6.  It it a great while since, when among those that were LordMarquesses of Saluzzo, the very greatest and worthiest man of them al,was a young Noble Lord, named Gualtiero, who having neyther wife norchilde, spent his time in nothing else but hawking and hunting: norhad he any minde of marriage, or to enjoy the benefit of children,wherein many did repute him the wiser. But this being distastfull tohis subjects, they very often earnestly solicited him, to matchhimselfe with a wife, to the end, that hee might not decease withoutan heire, nor they be left destitute of a succeeding Lord; offeringthemselves to provide him of such a one, so well descended by Fatherand Mother, as not only should confirm their hope, but also yeeldhim high contentment; whereto the Lord Marquess thus answered.

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1.  Upon a day, neere to the Chamber where the sicke man lay, theyentred into this communication. What shall we doe (quoth the one tothe other) with this man? We are much hindered by him: for to send himaway (sicke as he is) we shall be greatly blamed thereby, and itwill be a manifest note of our weake wisedome; the people knowing thatfirst of all we gave him entertainement, and have allowed him honestphysicall attendance, and he not having any way injuried or offendedus, to let him be suddenly expulsed our house (sicke to death as heis) it can be no way for our credit.
2.  Bruno descending downe the staires, found Phillippo and Nicholettain conference together, and stepping unto them, discoursed at large,what manner of man Calandrino was, and how farre he was falne inlove with her: so that they made a merry conclusion, what should beperformed in this case, onely to make a pastime of his hot begun love.And being come backe againe to Calandrino, he saide. It is the samewoman whereof I told thee, and therefore wee must worke wisely inthe businesse: for if Phillippo perceive any thing, all the water inArno will hardly serve to quench his fury. But what wouldst thouhave me say to her on thy behalfe, if I compasse the meanes tospeake with her? First of all (quoth Calandrino) and in the primeplace, tell her, that I wish infinite bushels of those blessings,which makes Maides Mothers, and begetteth children. Next, that I amonely hers, in any service she wil command me. Dooest thouunderstand me what I say? Sufficiently answered Bruno, leave all tome.
3.  On the morrow, after dinner, arming himselfe, and two more of hisservants with him, such as he had solemnly sworne to secrecy, hemounted on horsebacke, and rode on about a mile from his owneCastle, where he lay closely ambushed in a Wood, through whichGuardastagno must needs passe. After he had stayed there some twohoures space and more, he espyed him come riding with two of hisattendants, all of them being unarmed, as no way distrusting anysuch intended treason. So soone as he was come to the place, wherehe had resolved to do the deed; hee rushed forth of the ambush, andhaving a sharpe Lance readily charged in his rest, ran mainly athim, saying: False villaine, thou art dead. Guardastagno, havingnothing wherewith to defend himselfe, nor his servants able to givehim any succour; being pierced quite through the body with theLance, downe he fell dead to the ground, and his men (fearing the likemisfortune to befall them) gallopped mainely backe againe to theirLords Castle, not knowing them who had thus murthered their Master, byreason of their armed disguises, which in those martiall times wereusually worne.
4、  The Woman having her eyes fixed on the ground, knew not well howshee should denie him; and yet in plaine words, to say shee consented,shee held it to be overbase and immodest, and ill agreeing with herformer reputation: when the Abbot had well noted this attention inher, and how silent shee stood without returning any answere; heaccounted the conquest to be more then halfe his owne: so thatcontinuing on his former perswasions, hee never ceased, but alluredher still to beleeve whatsoever he saide. And much ashamed of hisimportunity, but more of her owne flexible yeelding weaknesse, madeanswere, that shee would willingly accomplish his request; which yetshee did not absolutely grant, untill Ferando were first sent intoPurgatory. And till then (quoth the Abbot) I will not urge any more,because I purpose his speedy sending thither: but yet, so farre lendme your assistance, that either to morrow, or else the next day, hemay come hither once more to converse with me. So putting a faire goldRing on her finger, they parted till the next meeting.
5、  THE FOURTH DAY

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网友评论(tXlqalmQ83053))

  • 坦米尔 08-10

      During the times of these occurrences, broad day speeding on, andthe poore man returning homeward by the Rialto, to visit his guestso left in bed: he beheld divers crouds of people, and a generallrumor noysed among them, that God Cupid had bene that night with MadamLisetta, where being over-closely pursued by her Brethren, for feareof being surprized, he leapt out of her window into the gulfe, andno one could tell what was become of him. Heereupon, the poore manbegan to imagine, that the guest entertained by him in the night time,must needs be the same suppose God Cupid, as by his wings and otherembellishments appeared: wherefore being come home, and sittingdowne on the beds side by him, after some few speeches passingbetweene them, he knew him to be Friar Albert, who promised to givehim fifty ducates, if he would not betray him to Lisettaes Brethren.Upon the acceptation of this offer, the money being sent for, andpaied downe; there wanted nothing now, but some apt and convenientmeanes, whereby Albert might safely be conveyed into the Monastery,which being wholly referred to the poore mans care and trust, thushe spake. Sir, I see no likely-hood of your cleare escaping home,except in this manner as I advise you. We observe this day as amerry Festivall, and it is lawfull for any one, to disguise a man inthe skin of a Beare, or in the shape of a savage man, or any otherforme of better advice. Which being so done, he is brought upon S.Markes market place, where being hunted a while with dogs, upon thehuntings conclusion, the Feast is ended; and then each man leadeshis monster whether him pleaseth. If you can accept any of theseshapes, before you be seene heere in my poore abiding, then can Isafely (afterward) bring you where you would be. Otherwise, I see nopossible meanes, how you may escape hence unknown; for it is withoutall question to the contrary, that the Gentlewomans brethren,knowing your concealment in some one place or other, wil set suchspies and watches for you throughout the City, as you must needs betaken by them.

  • 山口外丰 08-10

      Belcolore looking on the Cloake, said. How much may this Cloakebee worth? How much? quoth Sir Simon, upon my word Belcolore, it is ofa right fine Flanders Serdge, and not above eight dayes since, Ibought it thus (ready made) of Lotto the Fripperer, and payed for itsixe and twenty Florines, a pledge then sufficient for your ten. Is itpossible, said shee, that it should cost so much? Well, Sir Simon,deliver it me first, I will lay it up safe for you against Saturday,when if you fetch it not; I will redeeme mine owne things with it, andleave you to release it your selfe.

  • 吴昕丽 08-10

       When the honest meaning Host heard, what his own Wife and Adrianohad confirmed: he was verily perswaded, that Panuccio spake in adreame all this while: And to make it the more constantly apparant,Panuccio (being now growne wiser by others example) lay talking andblundring to himselfe, even as if dreames or perturbations of theminde did much molest him, with strange distractions in frantickemanner. Which the Hoste perceiving, and compassionating his case, asone man should do anothers: he tooke him by the shoulders, jogging andhunching him, saying. Awake Signior Panuccio, and get you gone henceto your owne bed.

  • 蓝姨 08-10

      When Madam Pampinea sate silent, and the Querries boldnesse equalledwith his crafty cunning, and great wisedom in the King had passedamongst them with a generall applause; the Queene turning her selfe toMadam Philomena, appointed her to follow next in order as the rest haddone before her: whereupon Philomena began after this maner.

  • 张林 08-09

    {  But I have none, nor thinke I ever shall.

  • 蔡峻峰 08-08

      The heate of affection thus encreasing day by day, Panuccio grewexceedingly desirous to enjoy the fruits of hi; long continued liking,and divers devises mustred in his braine, how he might compasse onenights lodging in her fathers house, whereof hee knew every part andparcell, as not doubting to effect what hee desired, yetundiscovered by any, but the maide her selfe.}

  • 华翰 08-08

      THAT PROVES TO BE OVERSAWCY WITH HIS MASTER

  • 肖津 08-08

      When the next foode was sent to Ferando, so much of the powder wasmingled with the wine, as would serve onely for foure houresentrauncing, in which time, they clothed him in his owne wearingapparell againe, the Abbot himselfe in person, and his honest trustyMonke of Bologna, conveying and laying him in the same vault under theTombe, where at the first they gave him buriall. The next morningfollowing, the breake of day, Ferando recovered his senses, and thorowdivers chinkes and crannies of the Tombe, descried daylight, which heehad not see in tenne moneths space before. Perceiving then plainely,that he was alive, he cryed out aloude, saying: Open, open, and letmee forth of Purgatory, for I have beene heere long enough inconscience. Thrusting up his head against the cover of the Tombe,which was not of any great strength, neither well closed together; heeput it quite off the Tombe, and so got forth upon his feete: atwhich instant time, the Monks having ended their morning Mattins,and hearing the noyse, ran in hast thither, and knowing the voyce ofFerando, saw that he was come forth of the Monument.

  • 张基伟 08-07

       WHEREBY IS GIVEN TO UNDERSTAND, THAT LOVE AND DEATH DO USE

  • 谢小金 08-05

    {  Afterward, they waited on her into the Hall againe, being their trueSoveraigne Lady and Mistresse, as she was no lesse in her poorestGarments; where all rejoycing for the new restored Mother, and happyrecovery of so noble a son and daughter, the Festivall continuedmany months after. Now every one thought the Marquesse to be a nobleand wise Prince, though somewhat sharpe and unsufferable, in thesevere experiences made of his wife: but (above al) they reputedGrizelda, to be a most wise, patient, and vertuous Lady. The Countof Panago, within few daies after returned backe to Bologna; and theLord Marques, fetching home old Janiculo from his country drudgery, tolive with him (as his Father in law) in his Princely Palace, gavehim honorable maintenance, wherein hee long continued, and ended hisdaies. Afterward, he matched his daughter in a Noble marriage: heand Grizelda living a long time together, in the highest honor thatpossibly could be.

  • 罗德·拉沃尔 08-05

      When the feasting dayes were finished, the garments of sadmourning were quite laid aside, and those (becomming so generall ajoy) put on, to make their hearts and habites suteable. Now,concerning the man slaine, and supposed to be Theobaldo, hee wasone, that in all parts of body, and truenesse of complexion so neerelyresembled him, as Theobaldoes owne brethren could not distinguishthe one from the other: but hee was of Lunigiana, named Fatinolo,and not Theobaldo, whom the two Brethren Inne-keepers maliced, aboutsome idle suspition conceived, and having slaine him, layde his bodyat the doore of Aldobrandino, where by reason of Theobaldoesabsence, it was generally reputed to be hee, and Aldobrandinocharged to doe the deede, by vehement perswasion of the brethren,knowing what love had passed betweene him and his daughterHermelina. But happy was the Pilgrims returne, first to heare thosewords in the Inne, the meanes to bring the murther to light, andthen the discreet carriage of the Pilgrime, untill he plainly approvedhimselfe, to bee truely Theobaldo.

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