0 一百万彩票网-APP安装下载

一百万彩票网 注册最新版下载

一百万彩票网 注册

一百万彩票网注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:娜塔莎·理查德森 大小:BrARziHC30697KB 下载:zck8Zua969627次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:DhQruAt033790条
日期:2020-08-04 01:55:04
安卓
夏桀

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then the Soldane strictly commaunded, that on some high andeminent place of the Citie, Ambroginolo should be bound and impaled ona stake, having his naked body nointed all over with hony, and neverto bee taken off, untill (of it selfe) it fell in peeces, which,according to the sentence, was presently performed. Next, he gaveexpresse charge, that all his mony and goods should be given toGenevra, which valued above ten thousand double Duckets. Forthwith asolemne Feast was prepared, wherein much honor was done to Bernardo,being the husband of Genevra: and to her, as to a most worthy woman,and matchlesse wife, he gave in costly jewels, as also vessels of goldand silver plate, so much as did amount to above ten thousand doubleDuckets more.
2.  By this time Thorello had opened his eyes, and looking round abouthim, perceived that hee was in the place of Saladines promise, whereofhee was not a little joyfull. Wherefore, sitting up in the bedde,and particularly observing all the things about him: albeit he knewsufficiently the magnificence of Saladine, yet now it appeared fargreater to him, and imagined more largely thereof, then hee coulddoe before. But yet, without any other ceremony, seeing the flightof the Monkes, hearing their cry, and perceiving the reason; he calledthe Abbot by his name, desiring him not to be afraid, for he was hisNephew Thorello, and no other.
3.  The fortunes of Rinaldo de Este, being heard by the Ladies andGentlemen, they admired his happinesse, and commended his devotionto Saint Julian, who (in such extreame necessity) sent him so goodsuccour. Nor was the Lady to be blamed, for leaving base liberty,and converting to the chaste embraces of the marriage bed, the dignityof Womens honour, and eternall disgrace living otherwise. While thusthey descanted on the happy night betweene her and Rinaldo, MadamPampinea sitting next to Philostratus, considering, that her Discoursemust follow in order, and thinking on what shee was to say; the Queenehad no sooner sent out her command, but she being no lesse fairethen forward, began in this manner. Ladies of great respect, themore we conferre on the accidents of Fortune, so much the moreremaineth to consider on her mutabilities, wherein there is no need ofwonder, if discreetly we observe that al such things as we fondlytearme to be our owne, are in her power, and so (consequently)change from one to another, without any stay or arrest (according toher concealed judgement) or setled order (at least) that can beeknowne to us. Now, although these things appeare thus dayly to us,even apparantly in all occasions, and as hath beene discerned bysome of our precedent Discourses; yet notwithstanding, seeing itpleaseth the Queene, that our arguments should aime at these ends, Iwill adde to the former tales another of my owne, perhaps notunprofitable for the hearers, nor unpleasing in observation.
4.  Now trust me Sir, (said Calandrino) that is an excellent Countrey todwell in: but I pray you tell me Sir, what do they with the Caponsafter they have boyld them? The Baschanes (quoth Maso) eate themall. Have you Sir, said Calandrino, at any time beene in thatCountrey? How? answered Maso, doe you demaund if have beene there? Yesman, above a thousand times, at the least. How farre Sir, I pray you(quoth Calandrino) is that worthy Countrey, from this our City? Introth, replyed Maso, the miles are hardly to be numbred, for themost part of them, we travell when we are nightly in our beddes, andif a man dreame right; he may be there upon a sudden.
5.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
6.  While thus he went about, considering on all these things veryrespectively, he saw the Maister of the Abbots Houshold (becausethen it was the houre of dinner) command water to be brought forwashing hands, so everie one sitting down at the Tatle, it fell to thelot of Primasso, to sit directly against the doore, whereat theAbbot must enter into the Hall. The custome in this Court was such,that no manner of Foode should be served to any of the Table, untillsuch time as the Lord Abbot was himselfe set: whereupon, every thingbeing fit and ready, the Master of the Houshold went to tell his Lord,that nothing now wanted but his onely presence.

计划指导

1.  And he (good man) never beleeving, that the Marquesse would longkeepe his daughter as his Wife, but rather expected dally, what nowhad happened: safely laid up the garments, whereof the Marquessedespoyled her, the same morning when he espoused her. Wherefore hedelivered them to her, and she fell to her fathers houshold businesse,according as formerly she had done; sustayning with a great andunconquerable spirit, all the cruell assaults of her enemy Fortune.
2.  This done, and plainely perceiving that they were not heard orseene, either by the Lady, or any other: the Duke tooke a light in hishand, going on to the bed, where the Lady lay most sweetelysleeping; whom the more he beheld, the more he admired andcommended: but if in her garments shee appeared so pleasing, whatdid shee now in a bed of such state and Majestie? Being no way dauntedwith his so late committed sin, but swimming rather in surfet ofjoy, his hands all bloody, and his soule much more ugly; he laidehim downe on the bed by her, bestowing infinite kisses and embraces onher, she supposing him to be the Prince all this while, not openingher eyes to bee otherwise resolved. But this was not the delight heaymed at, neither did he thinke it safe for him, to delay time withany longer tarrying there: Wherefore, having his agents at hand fitand convenient for the purpose, they surprized her in such sort,that shee could not make any noyse or outcry, and carrying her throughthe same false posterne, whereat themselves had entred, laying herin a Princely litter; away they went with all possible speede, nottarrying in any place, untill they were arrived neere Athens. Butthither he would not bring her, because himselfe was a married man,but rather to a goodly Castle of his owne, not distant farre fromthe City; where he caused her to bee kept very secretly (to her nolittle greefe and sorrow) yet attended on and served in mosthonourable manner.
3.  Ferando looking leane and pale, as one, that in so long time haddenot seene the light of heaven, and endured such strict disciplinetwice every day: stood in a gastly amazement by the Tombesside, as notdaring to adventure any further, or knowing perfectly, whether hewas (as yet) truly alive, or no. But when he saw the Monkes andAbbot comming, with their lighted Torches, and singing in a solemnemanner of Procession, he humbled himselfe at the Abbots feete, saying.Holy Father, by your zealous prayers (as hath bin miraculouslyrevealed to me) and the prayers of blessed S. Bennet; as also of myhonest, deare, and loving Wife, I have bin delivered from the painesof Purgatory, and brought againe to live in this world; for whichunspeakable grace and favour, most humbly I thanke the well-pleasedFates, S. Bennet, your Father-hood, and my kinde Wife, and willremember all your loves to me for ever. Blessed be the Fates, answeredthe Abbot, for working so great a wonder heere in our Monastery. Gothen my good Son, seeing the Fates have bin so gracious to thee; Go (Isay) home to thine owne house, and comfort thy kind wife, who eversince thy departure out of this life, hath lived in continuallmourning, love, cherish, and make much of her, never afflicting herhenceforth with causlesse jealousie. No I warrant you good Father,replyed Ferando; I have bin well whipt in Purgatory for such folly,and therefore I might be called a starke foole, if I should that wayoffend any more, either my loving wife, or any other.
4.  Ricciardo Minutolo fell in love with the wife of PhilippelloFighinolfi, and knowing her to be very jealous of her Husband, gaveher to understand, that hee was greatly enamoured of his Wife, and hadappointed to meete her privately in a Bathing house, on the next dayfollowing: where shee hoping to take him tardie with his closecompacted Mistresse, found her selfe to be deceived by the saidRicciardo.
5.  Beleeve it for a truth,
6.  Messer Guiglielmo of Rossiglione having slaine Messer GuiglielmoGuardastagno, whom hee imagined to love his wife, gave her his heartto eate. Which she knowing afterward, threw her selfe out of an highwindow to the ground; and being dead, was then buried with her friend.

推荐功能

1.  When Theobaldo had heard these words, hee began to consider withhimselfe, how many and great the dangers are, wherewith mens minds maydayly be molested. First, he thought on his owne brethren in theirsorrow, and buried a stranger insteed of him, accusing afterward (byfalse opinion, and upon the testimony of as false witnesses) a manmost innocent, making him ready for the stroke of death. Next, he madea strict observation in his soule, concerning the blinded severityof Law, and the Ministers thereto belonging, who pretending a diligentand carefull inquisition for truth, doe oftentimes (by theirtortures and torments) heare lies avouched (onely for ease of paine)in the place of a true confession, yet thinking themselves (by doingso) to be the Ministers of God and justice, whereas indeede they arethe Divels executioners of his wickednesse. Lastly, converting histhoughts to Aldobrandino, the imagined murtherer of a man yetliving, infinite cares beleagured his soule, in devising what mightbest be done for his deliverance.
2.  That findes no foe like ficklenesse?
3.  She beleeving verily that he was Gisippus, modestly answered. Sir, Ihave chosen you to be my Husband, reason requires then, that Ishould be willing to be your wife. At which words, a costly Ring,which Gisippus used daily to weare, he put upon her finger, saying.With this Ring, I confesse my selfe to be your Husband, and bind you(for ever) my Spouse and Wife; no other kind of marriage wasobserved in those dayes, and so he continued all the night with her,she never suspecting him to be any other then Gisippus, and thus wasthe marriage consumated, betweene Titus and Sophronia, albeit thefriends (on either side) thought otherwise.
4.  OF HIMSELFE, AND HIS TRUE HONOUR
5.   The Gossip inwardly smiling at her idle speeches, which(nevertheles) she avouched with very vehement asseverations: fellinstantly sicke of womens naturall disease, thinking every minute atedious month, till she were in company with some other Gossips, tobreake the obligation of her vertuous promise, and that others (aswell as her selfe) might laugh at the folly of this shallow-wittedwoman. The next day following, it was her hap to be at a wedding,among a great number of other women, whom quickly she acquaintedwith this so strange a wonder; as they did the like to their husbands:and passing so from hand to hand, in lesse space then two dayes, allVenice was fully possessed with it. Among the rest, the brethren tothis foolish woman, heard this admirable newes concerning theirSister; and they discreetly concealing it to themselves, closelyconcluded to watch the walks of this pretended God: and if he soarednot too lofty a flight, they would clip his wings, to come thebetter acquainted with him. It fortuned, that the Friar hearing hisCupidicall visitations over-publikely discovered, purposed to checkand reprove Lisetta for her indiscretion. And being habitedaccording to his former manner, his Friarly Cowle covering all hisformer bravery, he left his companion where he used to stay, andclosely walked along unto the house. No sooner was he entred, butthe Brethren being ambushed neere to the doore, went in after him, andascending the staires, by such time as he had uncased himselfe, andappeared like God Cupid, with his spangled wings displayed: theyrushed into the Chamber, and he having no other refuge, opened a largeCasement, standing directly over the great gulfe or River, andpresently leapt into the water; which being deepe, and he skilfullin swimming, he had no other harme by his fall, albeit the sodaineaffright did much perplex him.
6.  THE TENTH DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL

应用

1.  In a short while after, Master Doctor Mazzeo was returned fromMalfy, to proceede in his cure of the poore mans legge; and callingfor his glasse of Water, which he left standing in his owne Chamberwindow, it was found quite empty, and not a drop in it: whereat heraged so extreamly, as never had the like impatience bene noted inhim. His wife, and her Maide, who had another kinde of businesse intheir braine, about a dead man so strangely come to life againe,knew not well what to say; but at the last, his Wife thus replyedsomewhat angerly. Sir (quoth she) what a coyle is here about apaltry glasse of Water, which perhaps hath bene spilt, yet neytherof us faulty therein? Is there no more such water to be had in theworld? Alas deere Wife (saide he) you might repute it to be a commonkinde of Water, but indeed it was not so; for I did purposely compoundit, onely to procure a dead seeming sleepe: And so related the wholematter at large, of the Pacients legge, and his Waters losse.
2.  WHEREIN MAY BEE NOTED, THAT SUCH MEN AS WILL REPROVE THOSE
3.  Bertolomea turning towards him, and seeming as if shee smiled to herselfe, thus answered. Sir, speake you to me? Advise your selfe well,least you mistake me for some other, for mine owne part, I never sawyou till now. How now quoth Ricciardo? Consider better what you say,looke more circumspectly on me, and then you will remember, that Iam your loving husband, and my name is Ricciardo di Cinzica. Youmust pardon me Sir, replyed Bertolomea, I know it not so fitting for amodest; woman to stand gazing in the faces of men: and let me lookeuppon you never so often, certaine I am, that (till this instant) Ihave not seene you. My Lord Judge conceived in his minde, that thusshe denied all knowledge of him, as standing in feare of Pagamino, andwould not confesse him in his presence. Wherefore hee entreated ofPagamino, to affoord him so much favour, that he might speake alonewith her in her Chamber. Pagamino answered, that he was well contentedtherewith, provided, that he should not kisse her against her will.Then he requested Bartolomea, to goe with him alone into herChamber, there to heare what he could say, and to answere him asshee found occasion. When they were come into the Chamber, and nonethere present but he and shee, Signior Ricciardo began in this manner.Heart of my heart, life of my life, the sweetest hope that I have inthis world; wilt thou not know thine owne Ricciardo, who loveth theemore then he doth himselfe? Why art thou so strange? Am I sodisfigured, that thou knowest me not? Behold me with a more pleasingeye, I pray thee.
4、  When Sir Roger had received the royall reward, for thus surrenderingthe Count and his Sonne, the Count calling him to him, saide. Takethat Princely remuneration of my soveraigne Lord and King, andcommending me to your unkinde Father, tell him that your Childrenare no beggars brats, neither basely borne by their Mothers side.Sir Roger returning home with his bountifull reward, soone afterbrought his Wife and Mother to Paris, and so did Perotto his Wifewhere in great joy and triumph, they continued with while with thenoble Count; who had all his goods and honours restored to him, infarre greater measure then ever they were before: his Sonnes in Lawreturning home with their Wives into England, left the Count withthe King at Paris, where he spent the rest of his dayes in greathonour and felicity.
5、  Doest thou imagine Husband, that if I were so blinded in the eyes ofmy head, as thou art in them which should informe thine understanding;I could have found out the Priest, that would needs bee myConfessor? I knew thee Husband to be the man, and therefore I preparedmy wit accordingly, to fit thee with the foolish imagination whichthou soughtest for, and (indeed) gave it thee. For, if thou hadstbeene wise, as thou makest the world to beleeve by outwardapparance, thou wouldest never have expressed such a basenesse ofminde, to borrow the coulour of a sanctified cloake, thereby toundermine the secrets of thine honest meaning Wife. Wherefore, tofeede thee in thy fond suspition, I was the more free in myConfession, and tolde thee truely, with whom, and how heinously Ihad transgressed. Did I not tell thee, that I loved a Fryar? And artnot thou he whom love, being a Fryar, and my ghostly Father, though(to thine owne shame) thou madst thy selfe so? I said moreover, thatthere is not any doore in our house, that can keepe it selfe shutagainst him, but (when he pleaseth) he comes and lies with me. Nowtell me Husband, What doore in our house hath (at any time) bin shutagainst thee, but they are freely thine owne, and grant thee entrance?Thou art the same Friar that confest me, and lieth every night withme, and so often as thou sentst thy yong Novice or Clearke to me, asoften did I truly returne thee word, when the same Fryar lay withme. But (by jealousie) thou hast so lost thine understanding, thatthou wilt hardly beleeve all this.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(0ydwhByZ47558))

  • 张婷婷 08-03

      Leading her along by the arme towards the Garden, attended on by twoof her servants, and two of his owne; seeming as if he was sent fromthe Duke, to conferre with her: they walked alone to a Port opening onthe Sea, which standing ready open, upon a signe given by him to oneof his complices, the Barke was brought close to the shore; and theLadie being sodainly seized on, was immediately conveyed into it;and he returning backe to her people, with his sword drawne, said: Letno man stirre, or speake a word, except he be willing to loose hislife: for I intend not to rob the Duke of his faire friend, but toexpell the shame and dishonor that he hath offered to my Sister: noone being so hardy as to returne him any answer. Aboord wentConstantine with his consorts, and sitting neere to the Lady, whowrung her hands, and wept bitterly; he commaunded the Mariners tolaunch forth, flying away on the wings of the winde, till about thebreake of day following, they arrived at Melasso. There they tookelanding, and reposed on shore for some few dayes, Constantinelabouring to comfort the Lady, even as if she had bene his owneSister, shee having good cause to curse her infortunate beauty.

  • 卡罗拉 08-03

      Now was our Scholler the onely jocond man of the world, and failednot the time assigned him, but went unto the Ladies house, whereAncilla was ready to give him entertainment, conducting him into thebase Court, where she lockt him up fast, untill her Lady should sendfor him. This night shee had privately sent for her friend also, andsitting merrily at supper with him, told him, what welcome she hadgiven the Scholler, and how she further meant to use him, saying.Now Sir, consider with your selfe, what hot affection I beare tohim, of whom you became so fondly jealous. The which words were verywelcome to him, and made him extraordinarily joyful; desiring to seethem as effectually performed, as they appeared to him by herprotestations.

  • 旦白尼玛 08-03

       THE INDUCTION TO THE THIRD DAY

  • 辛小野 08-03

      quoth Egano, Yes Wife, he came, but deerely to my cost: for heeverily taking me for thee, hath beaten me most extreamly, calling mean hundred Whores and Strumpets, reputing thee to bee the wickedstWoman living. In good sadnesse Beatrix, I wondred not a little at him,that he would give thee any such vile speeches, with intent to wrongmee in mine honour. Questionlesse, because hee saw thee to bejoviall spirited, gracious and affable towardes all men; therefore heeintended to make triall of thine honest carriage. Well Sir (saydeshee) twas happy that hee tempted mee with words, and let you tastethe proofe of them by deeds: and let him thinke, that I brooke thosewords as distastably, as you do or can, his ill deeds. But seeing heis so just, faithfull, and loyall to you, you may love him the better,and respect him as you finde occasion.

  • 萨缪尔森 08-02

    {  An especiall time being appointed, when this amorous Combateshould be fought in loves field, Friar Reynard came to his Gossipshouse, where none being present to hinder his purpose, but onely theNursse which attended on the child, who was an indifferent faire andproper woman: his holy brother that came thither in his company(because Friars were not allowed to walke alone) was sent aside withher into the Pigeon loft, to enstruct her in a new kinde of Paternoster, lately devised in their holy Convent. In the meane while, asFriar Reynard and Agnesia were entring into hir chamber, she leadingher little son by the hand, and making fast the doore for their bettersafety: the Friar laide by his holie habit, Cowle, Hood, Booke, andBeads, to bee (in all respects) as other men were. No sooner were theythus entred the Chamber, but her husband Credulano, being come intothe house, and unseen of any, staid not till he was at the Chamberdoore, where hee knockt, and called for his Wife.

  • 侯莎莎 08-01

      Tofano (but in very uncivill maner) told her being abroad thatnight, and how she had used him: But the Neighbours seeing her to bewithin the house, and beleeving her, rather then him, in regard of histoo well knowne ill qualities; very sharpely reproved him, gave himgrosse speeches, pittying that any honest Woman should be socontinually abused. Now my good Neighbours (quoth she) you see whatmanner of man he is. What would you thinke of me, if I should walk thestreets thus in the night time, or be so late out of mine ownehouse, as this dayly Drunkard is? I was affraid least you would havegiven credit to his dissembling speeches, when he told you, that I wasat the Welles side, and threw something into the Well: but that I knowyour better opinion of me, and how sildome I am to be seene out ofdoores, although he would induce your sharper judgement of me, and laythat shame upon me, wherein he hath sinned himselfe.}

  • 丁薛祥 08-01

      Nothing could be done at any time, to yeilde her liking orcontent: moreover, she was so waspish, nice and squemish, that whenshe cam into the royall Court of France, it was hatefull andcontemptible to hir. Whensoever she went through the streets, everything stunke and was noisome to her; so that she never did any thingbut stop her nose; as if all men or women she met withall; andwhatsoever else she lookt on, were stinking and offensive. But letus leave all further relation of her ill conditions, being every way(indeed) so bad, and hardly becomming any sensible body, that wecannot condemne them so much as we should.

  • 阿克 08-01

      So soone as Calandrino heard these words, in dispairing manner hebeganne to rage, and cry out aloud, saying to his wife Ah thouwicked woman, this is long of thee, and thou hast done me thismischeefe for alwayes thou wilt be upon me, ever railing at mee, andfighting, untill thou hast gotten me under thee. Say thou divellishcreature, do I not tell thee true? The Woman, being of verie honestand civill conversation, hearing her husband speake so foolishly:blushing with shame, and hanging downe her head in bashfull manner;without returning any answer, went forth of her Chamber.

  • 胡某雄 07-31

       With one fierce stroke, quite passing through my heart:

  • 李道国 07-29

    {  When the Novel of Philostratus was concluded, which made some of theLadies blush, and the rest to smile: it pleased the Queene, that MadamPampinea should follow next, to second the other gone before; whenshe, smiling on the whole assembly, began thus. There are some menso shallow of capacity, that they will (neverthelesse) make shew ofknowing and understanding such things, as neither they are able todoe, nor appertaine to them: whereby they will sometimes reprehendother new errours, and such faults as they have unwillingly committed,thinking thereby to hide their owne shame, when they make it much moreapparant and manifest. For proofe whereof, faire company, in acontrary kinde I will shew you the subtill cunning of one, who(perhaps) may bee reputed of lesse reckning then Massetto; and yethe went beyond a King, that thought himselfe to be a much wiser man.

  • 安妮·穆 07-29

      Within a short while after, the Bishop and the Lord Marshal (alwaiesconversing together) it came to passe, that upon Saint johns day, theyriding thorow the City, side by side, and viewing the bravebeauties, which of them might best deserve to win the prize: theByshop espied a yong married Lady (which our late greevouspestilence bereaved us of) she being named Madame Nonna de Pulci,and Cousine to Messer Alexio Rinucci, a Gentleman well knowne untous all. A very goodly beautifull yong woman she was, of delicatelanguage, and singular spirite, dwelling close by S. Peters gate. ThisLady did the Bishop shew to the Marshall, and when they were come toher, laying his hand uppon her shoulder, he said. Madam Nonna, Whatthinke you of this Gallant? Dare you adventure another wager with him?

提交评论