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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:廉住楼 大小:o6tQeYv186699KB 下载:RLYh6TMC58852次
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日期:2020-08-15 13:36:49
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Indeede you say true Unckle, I am come home verie earely, because,since the day of my birth, I never saw a City so pestered withunhandsome people, both men and women, and worse this high Holyday,then ever I did observe before. I walked thorow some store ofstreetes, and I could not see one proper man: and as for the women,they are the most mishapen and ugly creatures, that, if God had mademe such an one, I should be sory that ever I was borne. And being nolonger able to endure such unpleasing sights; you wil not thinke(Unckle) in what an anger I am come home. Fresco, to whome thesestinking qualities of his Neece seemed so unsufferable, that hee couldnot (with patience) endure them any longer, thus short and quickelyanswered. Francesca, if all people of our Citie (both men and women)be so odious in thy eyes, and offensive to thy nose, as thou hastoften reported to me: bee advised then by my counsell. Stay stil athome, and look upon none but thy selfe onely, and then thou shalt besure that they cannot displease thee. But shee, being as empty ofwit as a pith-lesse Cane, and yet thought her judgement to exceedSalomons, could not understand the lest part of hir Unkles meaning,but stood as senselesse as a sheepe. Onely she replyed, that she wouldresort to some other parts of the country, which if shee found asweakly furnished of handsome people, as heere shee did, shee wouldconceive better of her selfe, then ever she had done before.
2.  Pamphilus having ended his Novell, whereat the Ladies laughedexceedingly, so that very hardly they could give over. The Queene gavecharge to Madame Eliza, that shee should next succeed in order;when, being scarcely able to refraine from smyling, thus she began.
3.  These words and their shrill out-cries also were heard by Neighboursdwelling neere to the Garden, who comming in sodainly uppon them,and seeing Pasquino lying dead, and hugely swoln, Strambo likewisecomplaining, and accusing Simonida to have poysoned him; she making noanswer, but standing in a gastly amazement, all her senses meerelyconfounded, at such a strange and uncouth accident, in loosing himwhom she so dearely loved: knew not how to excuse-her selfe, andtherefore every one verily beleeved, that Strambo had not unjustlyaccused her. Poore wofull maide, thus was she instantly apprehended,and drowned in her teares, they led her along to the Potes. tatesPalace, where her accusation was justified by Strambo, Lagina, and twomen more; the one named Atticciato, and the other Malagevole, fellowesand companions with Pasquino, who came into the Garden also upon theout-cry.
4.  But onely death. Grant then that I may die,
5.  Then he told them what the miraculous voice had said unto him,concerning the birth of another young Sonne, whom (according as he wascommanded) he caused to be named Bennet Ferando. Thus his returne tolife againe, and the daily wonders reported by him, caused no meaneadmiration in the people, with much commendation of the Abbotsholinesse, and Ferandoes happy curing his jealousie.
6.  Unto the place which made me first to mourne.

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1.  On the day following, which was towards the ending of the monethof May, Catharina began to complaine to her Mother that the season wasover-hot and tedious, to be still lodged in her Mothers Chamber,because it was an hinderance to her sleeping; and wanting rest, itwould be an empairing of her health. Why Daughter (quoth the Mother)the weather (as yet) is not so hot, but (in my minde) you may verywell endure it. Alas Mother, saide she, aged people, as you and myFather are, do not feele the heates of youthfull blood, by reason ofyour farre colder complexion, which is not to be measured by youngeryeeres. I know that well Daughter, replyed the Mother; but is it in mypower, to make the weather warme or coole, as thou perhaps wouldsthave it? Seasons are to be suffered, according to their severallqualities; and though the last night might seeme hot, this nextensuing may be cooler, and then thy rest will be the better. NoMother, quoth Catharina, that cannot be; for as Summer proceedethon, so the heate encreaseth, and no expectation can be of temperateweather, untill it groweth to Winter againe. Why Daughter, saide theMother, what wouldest thou have me to do? Mother (quoth she) if itmight stand with my Fathers good liking and yours, I would be sparedfrom the Garden Gallery, which is a great deale more coole lodged.There shall I heare the sweete Nightingale sing, as every night sheuseth to do, and many other pretty Birdes beside, which I cannot dolodging in your Chamber.
2.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, OF WHAT WORTH IT IS TO CONFESSE
3.  She saw beside in many places about her, goodly Woods, fayre cooleshades, and Country houses here and there dispersed; which added thegreater violence to hir affliction, that her desires (in all these)could no way be accomplished. What shall I say more concerning thisdisastrous Lady? The parching beames of the Sunne above her, thescalding heat of the Lead beneath her, the Hornets and Flyes everieway stinging her, had made such an alteration of her beautifull bodie:that, as it checkt and controlled the precedent nights darkenesse,it was now so metamorphosed with rednesse, yea, and blood issuingforth in infinite places, as she seemed (almost) loathsome to lookeon, continuing still in this agonie of torment, quite voyde of allhope, and rather expecting death, then any other comfort.
4.  There was not any one in the whole company, but much commended theNovell reported by Madam Aemilia, and when the Queene perceived it wasended, she turned towards Madam Eliza, commanding her to continue ontheir delightfull exercise: whereto she declaring her willingobedience, began to speake thus. Courteous Ladies, I remember oneunfortunate night, which happened to two Lovers, that were notindued with the greatest discretion. But because they had very manyfaire and happy dayes afterwards, I am the more willing for to let youheare it.
5.  Upon this fatall and unfortunate day to Madame Helena, it chanced,that a Clowne or Countrey Peazant belonging to her Farme or Dairyhouse, having two of his young Heyfers wandred astray, and helabouring in diligent search to finde them: within a while after theSchollers departure, came to seeke them in Woods about the Tower, and,notwithstanding all his crying and calling for his beasts, yet heheard the Ladies greevous moanes and lamentations. Wherefore, he cryedout so lowd as he could, saying: Who is it that mourneth so aloft onthe Tower? Full well she knew the voyce of her peazant, andtherefore called unto him, and sayd in this maner.
6.  WHEREIN MAY BEE NOTED, THAT SUCH MEN AS WILL REPROVE THOSE

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1.  The Monke very readily answered, saying. My good Lord, I have notyet beene so long in the Order of Saint Benedict, as to learne all theparticularities thereto belonging. And beside Sir, you never shewedmee or any of my Brethren, in what manner we young Monkes ought to usewomen, as you have otherwise done for our custome of prayer andfasting. But seeing you have so lately therein instructed mee, andby your owne example how to doe it: I heere solemnely promise you,if you please to pardon me but this one error, I will never failetherein againe, but dayly follow what I have seene you doe.
2.  And bids me not despaire;
3.  Then I wandred from assuring.
4.  In this honourable order (observed as his estated custom) hepersevered so long a while, as not onely the East parts, but alsothose in the west, were every where acquainted with his fame andrenown. Being already well stept into yeares, but yet not wearie(therefore) of his great charge and liberality: it fortuned, thatthe rumor of his noble Hospitality, came to the eare of anothergallant Gentleman, named Mithridanes, living in a Countrey not farreoff from the other.
5.   "I know well enough, that you held it as a desired benefit, Gisippusbeing a Native of your Citie, should also be linked to you byalliance: but I know no reason, why I should not be as neere and deereto you at Rome, as if I lived with you heere. Considering, when I amthere, you have a ready and well wishing friend, to stead you in allbeneficiall and serviceable offices, as carefull and provident foryour support, yea, a protectour of you and your affaires, as wellpublique as particular. Who is it then, not transported withpartiall affection, that can (in reason) more approve your act, thenthat which my friend Gisippus hath done? Questionlesse, not any one,as I thinke. Sophronia is married to Titus Quintus Fulvius, a NobleGentleman by antiquitie, a rich Citizen of Rome, and (which is aboveall) the friend of Gisippus: therfore, such a one as thinkes itstrange, is sorrie for it, or would not have it to be; knoweth notwhat he doth.
6.  But my fresh griefes still grow,

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1.  But leaving this, and come to the matter now in question, becauseI have no other testimony then mine owne words. You say, that youdid beate me, and cut those lockes of haire from my head. Alas Sir,why should you slander your selfe? In all your life time you did neverstrike me. And to approve the truth of my speeches, doe you yourselfe, and all else heere present, looke on me advisedly, if any signeof blow or beating is to be seene on me. Nor were it an easie matterfor you to doe either to smite, or so much as lay your hand (in anger)on me, it would cost dearer then you thinke for. And whereas yousay, that you did cut those lockes of haire from my head; it is morethen either I know, or felt, nor are they in colour like to mine: but,because my Mother and brethren shall be my witnesses therein, andwhether you did it without my knowledge; you shall all see, if they becut, or no. So, taking off her head attyre, she displayed her hayreover her shoulders, which had suffered no violence, neither seemedto bee so much as uncivilly or rudely handled.
2.  The time being come, which was concluded on for Iphigeniaesmarriage, in regard that the affianced husband had sent for her:Chynon thus communed with his owne thoughts. Now is the time (quothhe) to let my divine Mistresse see, how truly and honourably I doeaffect her, because (by her) I am become a man. But if I could bepossessed of her, I should growe more glorious, then the commoncondition of a mortall man, and have her I will, or loose my life inthe adventure. Being thus resolved, he prevailed with divers youngGentlemen his friends, making them of his faction, and secretlyprepared a Shippe, furnished with all things for a Naval fight,setting sodainly forth to Sea, and hulling abroad in those parts bywhich the vessell should passe, that must convey Iphigenia to Rhodesto her husband. After many honours done to them, who were to transporther thence unto Rhodes, being imbarked, they set saile upon theirBon viaggio.
3.  Tancrede, to denie what I have done, or to entreate any favourfrom you, is now no part of my disposition: for as the one canlittle availe me, so shall not the other any way advantage me.Moreover, I covet not that you should extend any clemency or kindnesseto me, but by my voluntary confession of the truth do intend (first ofall) to defend mine honour, with reasons sound, good, andsubstantiall, and then vertuously pursue to full effect, thegreatnesse of my minde and constant resolution. True it is, that Ihave loved, and still do, honourable Guiscardo, purposing the likeso long as I shall live, which will be but a small while: but if it bepossible to continue the same affection after death, it is for evervowed to him onely. Nor did mine owne womanish weaknesse so muchthereto induce me, as the matchlesse vertues shining clearly inGuiscardo, and the little respect you had of marrying me againe. Whyroyall Father, you cannot be ignorant, that you being composed offlesh and blood, have begotten a Daughter of the selfe samecomposition, and not made of stone or iron. Moreover, you ought toremember (although now you are farre stept in yeeres) what the Lawesof youth are, and with what difficulty they are to be contradicted.Considering withall, that albeit (during the vigour of your best time)you evermore were exercised in Armes; yet you should likewiseunderstand, that negligence and idle delights, have mighty power,not onely in young people, but also in them of greatest yeares.
4、  Let me tell you moreover, woorthy Woman, that see me reverenced hereas Lord Abbot, yet am I but as other men are, and in regard I amneither aged, nor mishapen, me thinkes the motion I have made,should be the lesse offensive to you, and therefore the soonergranted. For, all the while as Ferando remaineth in Purgatory, doe youbut imagine him to be present with you, and your perswasion will themore absolutely be confirmed. No man can, or shall be privy to ourclose meetings, for I carry the same holy opinion among all men, asyou your selfe conceived of me, and none dare be so saucie, as to callin question whatsoever I doe or say, because my words are Oracles, andmine actions more than halfe miracles; doe you not then refuse sogracious an offer. Enow there are, who would gladly enjoy that,which is francke and freely presented to you, and which (if you be awise Woman) is meerely impossible for you to refuse. Richly am Ipossessed of Gold and Jewels, which shall be all yours, if youplease in favour to be mine, wherein I will not be gaine-saide, exceptyour selfe do deny me.
5、  Having thus consulted with her selfe, many desperate motionsentred her minde, to throw her selfe headlong from off the Tarras;till better thoughts wone possession of her soule. And the Sunne beingrisen, shee went to every corner of the Tarras, to espye any Ladcome abroad with his beasts, by whom she might send for herwaitingwoman. About this instant, the Scholler who lay sleeping (allthis while) under a bush, suddenly awaking; saw her looke over thewall, and she likewise espyed him; whereupon hee said unto her. Goodmorrow Madame Helena, What? are the Ladies come yet or no? Helenabearing his scorning question, and grieving that hee should sodelude her: in teares and lamentations, she intreated him to comeneere the Tower, because she desired to speake with him. Whichcourtesie he did not deny her, and she lying groveling upon herbrest on the Tarras, to hide her body that no part thereof might beseene, but her head; weeping, she spake thus to him.

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网友评论(Oj3lnKgD14165))

  • 苏明光 08-14

      Never was any soule distrest,

  • 林曦 08-14

      WHEREON, UNDER THE GOVERNMENT OF MADAME AIMILIA, THE ARGUMENT OF

  • 程孝顶 08-14

       AMONG MEN

  • 张栋杜 08-14

      Which killes me quite,

  • 余兴光 08-13

    {  Which into gentle hearts too far doth pierce.

  • 吴越国 08-12

      So sweete a passion did possesse my soule,}

  • 范博梅尔 08-12

      In this honourable order (observed as his estated custom) hepersevered so long a while, as not onely the East parts, but alsothose in the west, were every where acquainted with his fame andrenown. Being already well stept into yeares, but yet not wearie(therefore) of his great charge and liberality: it fortuned, thatthe rumor of his noble Hospitality, came to the eare of anothergallant Gentleman, named Mithridanes, living in a Countrey not farreoff from the other.

  • 苏炎洪 08-12

      Then causing to be brought (for each of them) two goodly gowns orRobes (made after the Persian manner) the one lyned thorough withcloth of Gold, and the other with the costlyest Fur; not after suchfashion as Citizens or Marchants use to weare, but rather beseemingLords of greatest account, and three light under-wearing Cassocks orMandillions, of Carnatian Sattin, richly Imbroidred with Gold andPearles, and lined thorow with White Taffata, presenting these giftsto him, she sayd. I desire you Gentlemen to receive these meanetrifies, such as you see my Husband weares the like, and these otherbeside, considering you are so far from your Wives, having travailed along way already, and many miles more yet to overtake; alsoMarchants (being excellent men) affect to be comely and handsome intheir habits; although these are of slender value, yet (innecessity) they may do you service.

  • 薛绍彭 08-11

       APPROVING, THAT A REQUEST OUGHT TO BE CIVILL, BEFORE IT

  • 陆润庠 08-09

    {  Madame Catulla, having heard this long and unpleasing report,without any consideration, either what he was that tolde the tale,or what a treason he intended against her: immediately (as jealouspersons use to doe) she gave faith to his forgerie, and began todiscourse many things to him, which imagination had often misguidedher in, against her honest minded husband, and enflamed with rage,suddenly replied; that shee would doe according as he had advised her,as being a matter of no difficulty. But if he came, she would so shameand dishonour him, as no woman whatsoever should better schoole him.Ricciardo highly pleased herewith, and being perswaded, that hispurpose would take the full effect: confirmed the Lady in herdetermination with many words more; yet putting her in memory, tokeepe her faithfull promise made, without revealing the matter toany living person, as shee had sworne upon her faith.

  • 贺新禧 08-09

      The Ladie seeing her desire disappointed, and her fond expectationutterly frustrated: grew instantly forgetfull of her intemperate love,and falling into extremity of rage, converted her former gentle andloving speeches, into this harsh and ruder language. Villaine (quothshe) shall the longing comforts of my life, be abridged by thy baseand scornefull deniall? Shall my destruction be wrought by thy mostcurrish unkindenesse, and all my hoped joyes be defeated in amoment? Know Slave, that I did not so earnestly desire thy sweeteembracements before, but now as deadly I hate and despise them;which either thy death or banishment shall deerely pay for. Nosooner had she thus spoken, but tearing her haire, and renting hergarments in peeces, she ranne about like a distracted Woman, cryingout alowd; Helpe, helpe, the Count D'Angiers will forcibly dishonourmee, the lustfull Count will violate mine honour.

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