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2020-08-08 17:33:06  Դձ
齫׿ع 

齫׿أ

齫׿ַ:a g 9 559 v i p

'Was it your mama who taught you that piece?' I asked.

齫׿أ廭

'I have no brothers or sisters.'

'The one with red cheeks is called Miss Smith; she attends to thework, and cuts out- for we make our own clothes, our frocks, andpelisses, and everything; the little one with black hair is MissScatcherd; she teaches history and grammar, and hears the second classrepetitions; and the one who wears a shawl, and has apocket-handkerchief tied to her side with a yellow ribband, isMadame Pierrot: she comes from Lisle, in France, and teaches French.'

'Yes, and Miss Adele; they are in the dining-room, and John is gonefor a surgeon; for master has had an accident; his horse fell andhis ankle is sprained.'

齫׿أ ɻ

'Yes,' she said, 'it is a pretty place; but I fear it will begetting out of order, unless Mr. Rochester should take it into hishead to come and reside here permanently; or, at least, visit itrather oftener: great houses and fine grounds require the presenceof the proprietor.'<'Let Miss Eyre be seated,' said he: and there was something inthe forced stiff bow, in the impatient yet formal tone, which seemedfurther to express, 'What the deuce is it to me whether Miss Eyre bethere or not? At this moment I am not disposed to accost her.'

'Yes, that is it- that is the very word.'

齫׿أйҶ ۻ

The lady I had left might be about twenty-nine; the one who wentwith me appeared some years younger: the first impressed me by hervoice, look, and air. Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy incomplexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait andaction, like one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: shelooked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, anunder-teacher. Led by her, I passed from compartment to compartment,from passage to passage, of a large and irregular building; till,emerging from the total and somewhat dreary silence pervading thatportion of the house we had traversed, we came upon the hum of manyvoices, and presently entered a wide, long room, with great dealtables, two at each end, on each of which burnt a pair of candles, andseated all round on benches, a congregation of girls of every age,from nine or ten to twenty. Seen by the dim light of the dips, theirnumber to me appeared countless, though not in reality exceedingeighty; they were uniformly dressed in brown stuff frocks of quaintfashion, and long holland pinafores. It was the hour of study; theywere engaged in conning over their to-morrow's task, and the hum I hadheard was the combined result of their whispered repetitions.

'I was reading.'

<'Oh fie, Miss!' said Bessie.A small breakfast-room adjoined the drawing-room, I slipped inthere. It contained a bookcase: I soon possessed myself of a volume,taking care that it should be one stored with pictures. I mounted intothe window-seat: gathering up my feet, I sat cross-legged, like aTurk; and, having drawn the red moreen curtain nearly close, I wasshrined in double retirement.

A singular notion dawned upon me. I doubted not- never doubted-that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; andnow, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls-occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimlygleaming mirror- I began to recall what I had heard of dead men,troubled in their graves by the violation of their last wishes,revisiting the earth to punish the perjured and avenge theoppressed; and I thought Mr. Reed's spirit, harassed by the wrongsof his sister's child, might quit its abode- whether in the churchvault or in the unknown world of the departed- and rise before me inthis chamber. I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest anysign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me,or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me withstrange pity. This idea, consolatory in theory, I felt would beterrible if realised: with all my might I endeavoured to stifle it-I endeavoured to be firm. Shaking my hair from my eyes, I lifted myhead and tried to look boldly round the dark room; at this moment alight gleamed on the wall. Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moonpenetrating some aperture in the blind? No; moonlight was still, andthis stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling andquivered over my head. I can now conjecture readily that this streakof light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried bysome one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was forhorror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swiftdarting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world. Myheart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which Ideemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I wasoppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the doorand shook the lock in desperate effort. Steps came running along theouter passage; the key turned, Bessie and Abbot entered.

齫׿أͻ

<'Unjust!- unjust!' said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulusinto precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equallywrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape frominsupportable oppression- as running away, or, if that could not beeffected, never eating or drinking more, and letting myself die.The fiend pinning down the thief's pack behind him, I passed overquickly: it was an object of terror.

'For one thing, I have no father or mother, brothers or sisters.'

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齫׿50Ȱ׾Ƴ̷ۣ2´Ӥι¡ҽ 'What! to get more knocks?' ϸ

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齫׿֣"ʳ"Ƭɱ Ī""ӦPͼ:ӭ 'I don't dislike you, Miss: I believe I am fonder of you than ofall the others.' ϸ

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