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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:海登 大小:hwOtaC9O80227KB 下载:MUduRtfU97541次
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日期:2020-08-11 12:41:50
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王亚晖

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "On this Thoas son of Andraemon threw off his cloak and set outrunning to the ships, whereon I took the cloak and lay in itcomfortably enough till morning. Would that I were still young andstrong as I was in those days, for then some one of you swineherdswould give me a cloak both out of good will and for the respect due toa brave soldier; but now people look down upon me because my clothesare shabby."
2.  BOOK XIV.
3.  As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
4.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
5.  "Happy son of Peleus," answered the ghost of Agamemnon, "forhaving died at Troy far from Argos, while the bravest of the Trojansand the Achaeans fell round you fighting for your body. There youlay in the whirling clouds of dust, all huge and hugely, heedlessnow of your chivalry. We fought the whole of the livelong day, norshould we ever have left off if Jove had not sent a hurricane tostay us. Then, when we had borne you to the ships out of the fray,we laid you on your bed and cleansed your fair skin with warm waterand with ointments. The Danaans tore their hair and wept bitterlyround about you. Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortalnymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing wentforth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear. They wouldhave fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestorwhose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, flynot sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the seawith her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'
6.  "I agreed to this, so I went back to the sea shore, and found themen at the ship weeping and wailing most piteously. When they saw methe silly blubbering fellows began frisking round me as calves breakout and gambol round their mothers, when they see them coming hometo be milked after they have been feeding all day, and the homesteadresounds with their lowing. They seemed as glad to see me as thoughthey had got back to their own rugged Ithaca, where they had been bornand bred. 'Sir,' said the affectionate creatures, 'we are as glad tosee you back as though we had got safe home to Ithaca; but tell us allabout the fate of our comrades.'

计划指导

1.  "My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up,nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for Ivery well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sailfrom Ithaca. Nevertheless, Euryclea, take his bed outside the bedchamber that he himself built. Bring the bed outside this room, andput bedding upon it with fleeces, good coverlets, and blankets."
2.  "'Now there was a watchman whom Aegisthus kept always on thewatch, and to whom he had promised two talents of gold. This man hadbeen looking out for a whole year to make sure that Agamemnon didnot give him the slip and prepare war; when, therefore, this man sawAgamemnon go by, he went and told Aegisthus who at once began to lay aplot for him. He picked twenty of his bravest warriors and placed themin ambuscade on one side the cloister, while on the opposite side heprepared a banquet. Then he sent his chariots and horsemen toAgamemnon, and invited him to the feast, but he meant foul play. Hegot him there, all unsuspicious of the doom that was awaiting him, andkilled him when the banquet was over as though he were butchering anox in the shambles; not one of Agamemnon's followers was left alive,nor yet one of Aegisthus', but they were all killed there in thecloisters.'
3.  The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."
4.  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."
5.  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
6.  Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his headand covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians seethat he was weeping. When the bard left off singing he wiped the tearsfrom his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made adrink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressedDemodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, thenUlysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly. Noone noticed his distress except Alcinous, who was sitting near him,and heard the heavy sighs that he was heaving. So he at once said,"Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, we have had enoughnow, both of the feast, and of the minstrelsy that is its dueaccompaniment; let us proceed therefore to the athletic sports, sothat our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as boxers, wrestlers, jumpers,and runners."

推荐功能

1.  BOOK IV.
2.  "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.
3.  Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:
4.  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door[that led into the house] with the arrow standing against the top ofthe bow. Then he sat down on the seat from which he had risen, andAntinous said:
5.   As she spoke she drew a table loaded with ambrosia beside him andmixed him some red nectar, so Mercury ate and drank till he had hadenough, and then said:
6.  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.

应用

1.  And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."
2.  "Meanwhile Circe had been seeing that the men who had been leftbehind were washed and anointed with olive oil; she had also giventhem woollen cloaks and shirts, and when we came we found them allcomfortably at dinner in her house. As soon as the men saw eachother face to face and knew one another, they wept for joy and criedaloud till the whole palace rang again. Thereon Circe came up to meand said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, tell your men to leave offcrying; I know how much you have all of you suffered at sea, and howill you have fared among cruel savages on the mainland, but that isover now, so stay here, and eat and drink till you are once more asstrong and hearty as you were when you left Ithaca; for at present youare weakened both in body and mind; you keep all the time thinkingof the hardships- you have suffered during your travels, so that youhave no more cheerfulness left in you.'
3.  NOW there came a certain common tramp who used to go begging allover the city of Ithaca, and was notorious as an incorrigibleglutton and drunkard. This man had no strength nor stay in him, but hewas a great hulking fellow to look at; his real name, the one hismother gave him, was Arnaeus, but the young men of the place calledhim Irus, because he used to run errands for any one who would sendhim. As soon as he came he began to insult Ulysses, and to try anddrive him out of his own house.
4、  This was what Minerva was already eager to bring about, so downshe darted from off the topmost summits of Olympus.
5、  "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."

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  • 卡玛拉雅 08-10

      "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.

  • 尹帮忠 08-10

      Then Jove's daughter Helen bethought her of another matter. Shedrugged the wine with an herb that banishes all care, sorrow, andill humour. Whoever drinks wine thus drugged cannot shed a single tearall the rest of the day, not even though his father and mother both ofthem drop down dead, or he sees a brother or a son hewn in piecesbefore his very eyes. This drug, of such sovereign power and virtue,had been given to Helen by Polydamna wife of Thon, a woman of Egypt,where there grow all sorts of herbs, some good to put into themixing-bowl and others poisonous. Moreover, every one in the wholecountry is a skilled physician, for they are of the race of Paeeon.When Helen had put this drug in the bowl, and had told the servants toserve the wine round, she said:

  • 西兰 08-10

       Then Antinous said, "What god can have sent such a pestilence toplague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court,or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolenceand importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they havegiven you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easyto be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."

  • 武瑞琪 08-10

      As he was thus speaking a bird flew on his right hand- an eagle witha great white goose in its talons which it had carried off from thefarm yard- and all the men and women were running after it andshouting. It came quite close up to them and flew away on theirright hands in front of the horses. When they saw it they were glad,and their hearts took comfort within them, whereon Pisistratus said,"Tell me, Menelaus, has heaven sent this omen for us or for you?"

  • 汪亮 08-09

    {  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.

  • 符箓 08-08

      "The sons of Atreus called a meeting which was not as it shouldbe, for it was sunset and the Achaeans were heavy with wine. When theyexplained why they had called- the people together, it seemed thatMenelaus was for sailing homeward at once, and this displeasedAgamemnon, who thought that we should wait till we had offeredhecatombs to appease the anger of Minerva. Fool that he was, hemight have known that he would not prevail with her, for when the godshave made up their minds they do not change them lightly. So the twostood bandying hard words, whereon the Achaeans sprang to their feetwith a cry that rent the air, and were of two minds as to what theyshould do.}

  • 伍克振 08-08

      Then Jove's daughter Minerva came up to them, having assumed theform and voice of Mentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and saidto his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that are about to fight inan engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not todisgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength andcourage all the world over."

  • 杨志亮 08-08

      "Telemachus, you should not remain so far away from home any longer,nor leave your property with such dangerous people in your house; theywill eat up everything you have among them, and you will have beenon a fool's errand. Ask Menelaus to send you home at once if youwish to find your excellent mother still there when you get back.Her father and brothers are already urging her to marry Eurymachus,who has given her more than any of the others, and has been greatlyincreasing his wedding presents. I hope nothing valuable may have beentaken from the house in spite of you, but you know what women are-they always want to do the best they can for the man who marries them,and never give another thought to the children of their first husband,nor to their father either when he is dead and done with. Go home,therefore, and put everything in charge of the most respectablewoman servant that you have, until it shall please heaven to sendyou a wife of your own. Let me tell you also of another matter whichyou had better attend to. The chief men among the suitors are lying inwait for you in the Strait between Ithaca and Samos, and they meanto kill you before you can reach home. I do not much think they willsucceed; it is more likely that some of those who are now eating upyour property will find a grave themselves. Sail night and day, andkeep your ship well away from the islands; the god who watches overyou and protects you will send you a fair wind. As soon as you getto Ithaca send your ship and men on to the town, but yourself gostraight to the swineherd who has charge your pigs; he is welldisposed towards you, stay with him, therefore, for the night, andthen send him to Penelope to tell her that you have got back safe fromPylos."

  • 曹凤岐 08-07

       "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."

  • 利市 08-05

    {  Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."

  • 宋茜 08-05

      "I stuck to the ship till the sea knocked her sides from her keel(which drifted about by itself) and struck the mast out of her inthe direction of the keel; but there was a backstay of stoutox-thong still hanging about it, and with this I lashed the mast andkeel together, and getting astride of them was carried wherever thewinds chose to take me.

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