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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张永昌 大小:J8EuWjP633621KB 下载:xC9Q5OQo87832次
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日期:2020-08-13 05:35:01
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杨芙蓉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  BEING INJURIED AND OFFENDED BY THEM THAT THEY LOVE
2.  THE TENTH DAY, THE FIFT NOVELL
3.  Gracious ladies, it may be you have not heard how the Devil is putin Hell. Therefore, and since it will not be far off the subject ofthis day's discourse, I will tell it you. Perhaps, hearing it, you maythe better understand that albeit Love more affects gay palaces andluxurious bowers than the cabins of the poor, yet he by no meansdisdains to manifest his power even in the depths of the forest, onstark mountains and in the caves of the desert; and thus we mustacknowledge that all things wheresoever they be are subject to him.
4.  Calandrino (who was close by them) hearing these wordes, andseeing the whole manner of their wondering behaviour: becameconstantly perswaded, that hee had not onely found the precious stone;but also had some store of them about him, by reason he was so neereto them, and yet they could not see him, therefore he walked beforethem. Now was his joy beyond all compasse of expression, and beingexceedingly proud of so happy an adventure: did not meane to speakeone word to them, but (heavily laden as hee was) to steale homefaire and softly before them, which indeede he did, leaving them tofollow after, if they would. Bruno perceiving his intent, said toBuffalmaco: What remaineth now for us to doe? Why should not we gohome, as well as hee? And reason too, replyed Bruno. It is in vaine totarry any longer heere: but I solemnly protest, Calandrino shall nomore make an Asse of me: and were I now as neere him, as not longsince I was, I would give him such a remembrance on the heele withthis Flint stone, as should sticke by him this moneth, to teach hima lesson for abusing his friends.
5.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL
6.  Such imbroydered bodies, tricked and trimmed in such boastingbravery, are they any thing else but as Marble Statues, dumbe, dull,and utterly insensible? Or if (perchaunce) they make an answere,when some question is demanded of them; it were much better for themto be silent. For defence of honest devise and conference among menand women, they would have the world to thinke, that it proceedeth butfrom simplicity and precise opinion, covering their owne folly withthe name of honesty: as if there were no other honest woman, butshee that conferres onely with her Chambermaide, Laundresse, orKitchin-woman: as if nature had allowed them, (in their owne idleconceite) no other kinde of talking.

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1.  Marke now, how quickly misery can receive comfort, upon so poore andsilly a question; for Guion began to elevate his dejected countenance,and looking on the Admirall, returned him this answer. Sir, heretoforeI have bene the man which you speake of; but now, both that name andman must die with me. What misfortune (said the Admirall) hath thusunkindly crost thee? Love (answered Guion) and the Kingsdispleasure. Then the Admirall would needs know the whole history atlarge, which briefly was related to him, and having heard how allhad happened; as he was turning his Horse to ride away thence, Guioncalled to him, saying, Good my Lord, entreat one favour for me, ifpossibly it may be. What is that? replyed the Admirall. You see Sir(quoth Guior) that I am very shortly to breathe my last; all the gracewhich I do most humbly entreat, is, that as I am here with this chasteVirgin, (whom I honour and love beyond my life) and miserably boundbacke to backe: our faces may be turned each to other, to the end,that when the fire shall finish my life, by looking on her, my soulemay take her flight in full felicity. The Admirall smiling, said; Iwill do for thee what I can, and (perhaps) thou mayest so long lookeon her, as thou wilt be weary, and desire to looke off her.
2.  The friendly Merchant, and likewise the Ladie, hearing thesewords, wept both bitterly: and after hee had given over speaking,kindely they comforted him, with promises and solemne Vowes, that ifhee dyed, all should be performed which hee had requested. Within ashort while after, he departed out of this life, and they gave himverie honourable buriall, according to that Country custome. Whichbeing done, the Merchant dispatching all his affaires at Rhodes, wasdesirous to returne home to Cyprus, in a Carracke of the Catelans thenthere being: mooving the Ladie in the matter, to understand how sheestoode enclined, because urgent occasions called him thence to Cyprus.The Lady made answere, that shee was willing to passe thither withhim, hoping for the love hee bare to deceased Antiochus, that heewould respect her as his Sister. The Merchant was willing to giveher any contentment, but yet resolved her, that under the title ofbeing his Sister, it would be no warrant of securitie to them both.Wherefore, hee rather advised her, to stile him as her husband, and hewould terme her his Wife, and so hee should be sure to defend her fromall injuries whatsoever.
3.  A yong Scholler, named Felice, enstructed Puccio di Rinieri, howto become rich in a very short time. While Puccio made experience ofthe instructions taught him; Felice obtained the favour of hisDaughter.
4.  Having obtained licence of his Superiour, and being accompaniedwith an holy Brother of the Convent, yet ignorant of the businesseby him intended; he went to the house of a friend of his, which washis usuall receptacle, whensoever he went about such deeds of darknes.There did he put on his dissembled habit of God Cupid, with hiswinges, Bowe, and Quiver, in formall fashion; and then (clouded overwith his Monkes Cowle) leaves his companion to awaite his returningbacke, while he visited foolish Lisetta, according to her expectation,readily attending for the Gods arrivall.
5.  In the end, she resolved to try how her husband would take it,that so strange an accident should thus happen in his house, andputting the case as if it did not concerne them, but any other ofthe neighbours; awaking him first, demaunded of him what was best tobe done, if a man should steale into a neighbours house, unknowne tohim, or any of his family; and in his bed chamber to be found dead. Hepresently replyed (as not thinking the case concerned himselfe)that, the onely helpe in such an unexpected extremity, was to take thedead body, and convey it to his owne house, if he had any; wherebyno scandall or reproach would follow to them, in whose house he had sounfortunately dyed. Hereupon she immediately arose, and lighting acandle, shewed him the dead body of Jeronimo, with protestation ofevery particular, both of her innocency, either of knowledge of hiscomming thither, or any other blame that could concerne her. Whichhe both constantly knowing and beleeving, made no more ceremony, butputting on his Garments, tooke the dead body upon his shoulders, andcarried it to the Mothers doore, where he left it, and afterwardreturned to his owne house againe.
6.  Afterward, he demanded of him, how much displeasing to God hee hadbeene in the sinne of Gluttony? When (sighing againe greatly) heeanswered: Too much, and too often, good Father. For, over and besidethe Fasts of our Lent season, which everie yeare ought to bee duelyobserved by devout people, I brought my selfe to such a customarieuse, that I could fast three dayes in every Weeke, with Bread andWater. But indeede (holy Father) I confesse, that I have drunkewater with such a pleasing appetite and delight (especially inpraying, or walking on pilgrimages) even as greedy drunkards doe, indrinking good Wine. And many times I have desired such Sallades ofsmall hearbes, as Women do gather abroad in the open fields, andfeeding onely upon them, without coveting after any other kinde ofsustenance, hath seemed much more pleasing to me, then I thought toagree with the nature of Fasting, especially, when as it swervethfrom devotion, or is not done as it ought to bee.Sonne, Sonne, replied the Confessour, these sinnes are naturall,and very light, and therefore I would not have thee to charge thyconscience with them, more then is needfull. It happeneth to every man(how holy soever he be) that after he hath fasted overlong, feedingwill be welcome to him, and drinking good drinke after his travaile. OSir, (said Maister Chappelet) never tell me this to comfort me, forwell you know, and I am not ignorant therein, that such things asare done for the service of God, ought all to be performed purely, andwithout any blemish of the minde; what otherwise is done, savoureth ofsinne. The Friar being well contented with his words, said: It isnot amisse that thou understandest it in this manner, and thyconscience thus purely cleared, is no little comfort to me. But tellme now concerning Avarice, hast thou sinned therein, by desiringmore then was reasonable, or withholding from others, such things asthou oughtst not to detaine? Wherein Maister Chappelet answered.Good Father, I would not have you to imagine, because you see melodged heere in the house of two Usurers, that therefore I am of anysuch disposition. No truely Sir, I came hither to no other end, butonely to chastise and admonish them in friendly manner, to clensetheir mindes from such abhominable profit: And assuredly, I shouldhave prevailed therein, had not this violent sicknesse hindered mineintention. But understand (holy Father) that my parents left me a richman, and immediatly after my Fathers death, the greater part of hisgoods I gave away for Gods sake, and then, to sustaine mine owne life,and to helpe the poore members of Jesus Christ, I betooke my selfeto a meane estate of Merchandise, desiring none other then honestgaine thereby, and evermore whatsoever benefit came to me; Iimparted halfe thereof to the poore, converting mine owne smallportion about my necessary affaires, which that other part wouldscarcely serve to supply: yet alwayes God gave thereto such amercifull blessing, that my businesse dayly thrived more and more,arising still from good to better.

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1.  Secretly she sent a faithfull Chambermaide of her owne, to greeteAnastasio on her behalfe; humbly entreating him te come see her:because now she was absolutely determined, to give him satisfaction inall which (with honour) he could request of her. Whereto Anastasioanswered, that he accepted her message thankfully, and desired noother favour at her hand, but that which stood with her owne offer,namely, to be his Wife in honourable marriage, The Maide knowingsufficiently, that he could not be more desirous of the match, thenher Mistresse shewed her selfe to be, made answer in her name, thatthis motion would be most welcome to her.
2.  She beleeving verily that he was Gisippus, modestly answered. Sir, Ihave chosen you to be my Husband, reason requires then, that Ishould be willing to be your wife. At which words, a costly Ring,which Gisippus used daily to weare, he put upon her finger, saying.With this Ring, I confesse my selfe to be your Husband, and bind you(for ever) my Spouse and Wife; no other kind of marriage wasobserved in those dayes, and so he continued all the night with her,she never suspecting him to be any other then Gisippus, and thus wasthe marriage consumated, betweene Titus and Sophronia, albeit thefriends (on either side) thought otherwise.
3.  for none other meete,
4.  Such as were so disposed, were licensed by the King to take theirrest: and they that would not, he permitted them to their wontedpastimes, each according to their minds. But when they were risen fromsleepe, and the rest from their other exercises, it seemed to bemore then high time, that they should prepare for talke andconference. So, sitting downe on Turky Carpets, which were spredabroad on the green grasse, and close by the place where they haddined: the King gave command, that Madam Aemillia should firstbegin, whereto she willingly yeelding obedience, and expecting suchsilent attention, as formerly had bin, thus she began.
5.   Poore soule, why live I then?
6.  But leave we this, and returne wee backe to vertuous FryarReynard, who falling again& to his former appetites; became an oftenvisitant of his Gossip Agnesia, and now hee had learned such ablushlesse kinde of boldnesse; that he durst be more instant withher (concerning his privie sute) then ever formerly he had bin, yeaeven to solicite the enjoying of his immodest desires. The goodGentlewoman, seeing her selfe so importunately pursued, and FriarReynard appearing now (perhappes) of sweeter and more delicatecomplexion, the at his entrance into Religion: at a set time of hissecret communing with her; she answered him in as apt tearmes, as theyuse to do, who are not greatly sqeamish, in granting mattersdemanded of them.

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1.  THE THIRD DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL
2.  Hereupon, he secretly called Jehannot before him, examining himparticularly of all his passed life, and finding (by most manifestarguments) that his name was truly Geoffrey, and the eldest son ofHenriet Capece, he spake thus to him. Jehannot, thou knowest how greatthe injuries are that thou hast done me, and my deere daughter; gentlyintreating thee (as became an honest servant) that thou shouldestalwayes have bene respective of mine honor, and all that appertaineunto me. There are many noble Gentlemen, who sustaining the wrongwhich thou hast offred me, they would have procured thy shamefulldeath, which pitty and compassion will not suffer in me. Whereforeseeing (as thou informest me) that thou art honourably derived both byfather and mother, I will give end to all thy anguishes, even when thyselfe art so pleased, releasing thee from that captivity wherein Ihave so long kept thee, and in one instant, reduce thine honor andmine into compleat perfection. As thou knowest my daughter Spina, whomthou hast embraced as a friend (although far unfitting for thee, orher) is a widdow, and her marriage is both great and good; what hermanners and conditions are, thou indifferently knowest, and art notignorant of her father and mother: concerning thine owne estate, asnow I purpose not to speake any thing. Therefore, when thou wilt, I amdetermined, that whereas thou hast immodestly affected her, sheshall become thy honest wife, and accepting thee as my sonne, toremaine with me so long as you both please.
3.  Sometime heeretofore, there dwelt in our Cittie, a Knight namedSignior Theobaldo, who (according as some report) issued from theFamily of Lamberti, but others derive him of the Agolanti; guiding(perhaps) their opinion heerein, more from the traine of Children,belonging to the saide Theobaldo (evermore equall to that of theAgolanti) then any other matter else. But setting aside from whichof these two houses he came, I say, that in his time he was a verywealthy Knight, and had three sonnes; the first being namedLamberto, the second Theobaldo, and the third Agolanto, all goodly andgracefull youths: howbeit, the eldest had not compleated eighteeneyeares, when Signior Theobaldo the Father deceased, who left themall his goods and inheritances. And they, seeing themselves rich inready monies and revennewes, without any other governement thentheir owne voluntary disposition, kept no restraint upon theirexpences, but maintained many servants, and store of unvalewableHorses, beside Hawkes and Hounds, with open house for all commers; andnot onely all delights else fit for Gentlemen, but what vanitiesbeside best agreed with their wanton and youthfull appetites.
4、  And for your better information in every particulare; a Beaste,blacke and horned, but of no great stature, will come to fetch you:perhaps he will use some gastly noises, straunge leapes, and loftietrickes, onely to terrifie and affright you: but when he perceiveththat he cannot daunt you, hee will gently come neere you, which whenhe hath done, you may descend from off the Tombe; and, withoutnaming or thinking on God, or any of his Saintes, mount boldly onhis backe, for he will stand ready to receive you. Being so seated,crosse your armes over your brest, without presuming to touch orhandle the Beast, for he will carry you thence softly, and so bringyou along to the company. But if in all this time of your travaile,you call on heaven, any Saint, or bee possessed with the least thoughtof feare: I must plainely tell you, that either hee will cast youdangerously, or throw you into some noysom place. And therefore, ifyou know your selfe, not to be of a constant courage, and sprightlybold, to undertake such an adventure as this: never presume anyfurther, because you may doe us a great deale of injurie, withoutany gaine or benefite to your selfe, but rather such wrong, as wewould be very sorry should happen unto so deere a Friend.
5、  The dealings of Alessandro in England grew verie great, for hee lentout much money to many Gentlemen, Lords, and Barons of the Land,upon engagement of their Mannors; Castles, and other revennues: fromwhence he derived immeasurable benefite. While the three Brethren heldon in their lavish expences, borrowing moneys when they wanteduntill their supplies came from England, whereon (indeede) was theyronely dependance: it fortuned, that (contrary to the opinion of allmen) warre happened betweene the King of England, and one of hissonnes, which occasioned much trouble in the whole Countrey, by takingpart on either side, some with the sonne, and other with the Father.In regard whereof, those Castles and places pawned to Alessandro, weresodainely seized from him, nothing then remaining, that turned him anyprofite. But living in hope day by day, that peace would beconcluded betweene the Father and the Sonne, he never doubted, but allthings then should be restored to him, both the principall andinterest, and therfore he would not depart out of the Countrey.

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  • 权峰 08-12

      When they were come to the Court, and the King made acquaintedwith the words, which Rogiero spake to his Mule; he was called intothe presence, where the King shewed him a gracious countenance, anddemanded of him, why he had compared him to his Mule? SigniorRogiero nothing daunted, but with a bold and constant spirit, thusanswered. Sir, I made the comparison, because, like as you give, wherethere is no conveniency, and bestow nothing where reason requireth:even so, the Mule would not stale where she should have done, butwhere was water too much before, there she did it. Beleeve meSignior Rogiero, replyed the King, if I have not given you such gifts,as (perhaps) I have done to divers other, farre inferiour to you inhonour and merit; this happened not thorough any ignorance in me, asnot knowing you to be a most valiant Knight, and well-worthy ofspeciall respect: but rather through your owne ill fortune, whichwould not suffer me to doe it, whereof she is guilty, and not I, asthe truth thereof shall make it selfe apparant to you. Sir, answeredRogiero, I complaine not, because I have received no gift from you, asdesiring thereby covetously to become the richer: but in regard youhave not as yet any way acknowledged, what vertue is remaining inme. Neverthelesse, I allow your excuse for good and reasonable, and amheartely contented, to behold whatsoever you please; although I doeconfidently credit you, without any other testimony.The King conducted him then into the great Hall, where (as hee hadbefore given order) stood two great Chests, fast lockt; in thepresence of all his Lords, the King thus spake. Signior Rogiero, inone of these Chests is mine imperiall Crowne, the Scepter Royall,the Mound, and many more of my richest girdles, rings, plate, andjewels, even the very best that are mine: the other is full of earthonely. Chuse one of these two, and which thou makest election of; uponmy Royall word thou shalt enjoy it. Hereby shalt thou evidentlyperceive, who hath bin ingreatful to the deservings, either I, orthine owne bad fortune. Rogiero seeing it was the kings pleasure tohave it so; chose one of them, which the King caused presently to beopened, it approving to be the same that was full of earth, whereatthe King smyling, said thus unto him. You see Signior Rogiero, thatwhat I said concerning your ill fortune, is very true: butquestionlesse, your valour is of such desert, as I ought to opposemy selfe against all her malevolence. And because I know right, thatyou are not minded to become a Spaniard; I will give you neitherCastle nor dwelling place: but will bestow the Chest on you (in meerdespight of your malicious fortune) which she so unjustly tooke awayfrom you. Carry it home with you into your Countrey, that there it maymake an apparant testimoney, in the sight of all your well-willers,both of your owne vertuous deservings, and my bounty. SigniorRogiero humbly receiving the Chest, and thanking his Majestie for soliberall a gift, returned home joyfully therewith, into his nativeCountrey of Tuscane.

  • 石礅 08-12

      And so consider of my miseries,

  • 吴宜璟 08-12

       It is a matter most convenient (deare Ladies) that a man ought tobegin whatsoever he doth, in the great and glorious name of him, whowas the Creator of all things. Wherefore, seeing that I am the manappointed, to begin this your invention of discoursing Novelties: Iintend to begin also with one of his wonderfull workes. To the end,that this being heard, our hope may remaine on him, as the thing onelypermanent, and his name for ever to be praised by us. Now, as there isnothing more certaine, but that even as temporall things are mortalland transitory, so are they both in and out of themselves, full ofsorrow, paine, and anguish, and subjected to infinite dangers: So inthe same manner, we live mingled among them, seeming as part ofthem, and cannot (without some error) continue or defend our selves,if God by his especiall grace and favour, give us not strength andgood understanding. Which power we may not beleeve, that either itdescendeth to us, or liveth in us, by any merites of our owne; butof his onely most gracious benignity. Mooved neverthelesse andentreated by the intercessions of them, who were (as we are)mortals; and having diligently observed his commandements, are nowwith him in eternall blessednes. To whom (as to advocates andprocurators, informed by the experience of our frailty) wee are not topresent our prayers in the presence of so great a Judge; but onelyto himselfe, for the obtaining of all such things as his wisedomeknoweth to be most expedient for us. And well may we credit, thathis goodnesse is more fully enclined towards us, in his continuallbounty and liberality; then the subtilty of mortall eye, can reachinto the secret of so divine a thought: and sometimes therefore we maybe beguiled in opinion, by electing such and such as our intercessorsbefore his high Majesty, who perhaps are farre off from him, or driveninto perpetuall exile, as unworthy to appeare in so glorious apresence. For he, from whom nothing can be hidden, more regardeththe sincerity of him that prayeth, then ignorant devotion, committedto the trust of a heedlesse intercessor; and such prayers have alwaiesgracious acceptation in his sight. As manifestly will appeare, bythe Novell which I intend to relate; manifestly (I say) not as inthe judgement of God, but according to the apprehension of men.

  • 王丽辉 08-12

      But all would rob me of my golden gaine.

  • 郭超闫 08-11

    {  When it was almost day, she heard a great noise of people travailingby, whereupon sodainly slie arose, and ranne into a Garden plot, whichwas on the backside of the poore Cottage, espying in one of thecorners a great stacke of Hay, wherein she hid her selfe, to theend, that travelling strangers might not readily finde her there inthe house. Scarsely was she fully hidden, but a great company ofTheeves and Villaines, finding the doore open, rushed into theCottage, where looking round about them for some booty, they saw theDamosels horse stand ready sadled, which made them demand to whom itbelonged. The good old man, not seeing the Maiden present there, butimmagining that she had made some shift for her selfe, answeredthus. Gentlemen, there is no body here but my wife and my selfe: asfor this Horse, which seemeth to be escaped from the Owner; hee camehither yesternight, and we gave him house-roome heere, rather thento be devoured by Wolves abroad. Then said the principall of theTheevish crew: This horse shall be ours, in regard he hath no otherMaster, and let the owner come claime him of us.

  • 黄继汇 08-10

      The fight (as you have formerly heard) continuing betweene Robertoand Arriguccio, the neighbours hearing of the clashing of their Swordsin the streets; arose out of their beds, and reproved them in veryharsh manner. In which respect Arriguccio, fearing to be knowne, andignorant also what his adversary was (no harme being as yet done oneither side) permitted him to depart; and extreamely full of anger,returned backe againe to his house. Being come up into hisbed-chamber, thus he began; Where is this lewde and wicked woman?what? hast thou put out the light, because I should not finde thee?that shall not avayle thee, for I can well enough finde a drab inthe darke. So, groping on to the beds side, and thinking hee had takenholde on his wife, he grasped the Chamber-maide, so beating her withhis fists, and spurning her with his feet, that al her face was bloodyand bruised. Next, with his knife he cut off a great deal of herhaire, giving her the most villanous speeches as could be devised:swearing, that he would make her a shame to all the world.}

  • 毛娟 08-10

      Master Simon the Physitian, by the perswasions of Bruno, Buffalmaco,and a third Companion, named Nello, made Calandrino to beleeve, thathe was conceived great with childe. And having Physicke ministred tohim for the disease: they got both good fatte Capons and money of him,and so cured him, without any other man of deliverance.

  • 刘贤虎 08-10

      It fortuned, that Pedro having no certaine knowledge of the way, butfollowing a trackt guiding too farre on the left hand; rode quiteout of course, and came at last within sight of a small Castle, out ofwhich (before they were aware) yssued twelve Villaines, whomAngelina sooner espyed, then Pedro could do; which made her cry out tohim, saying: Helpe deere Love to save us, or else we shall beassayled. Pedro then turning his horse so expeditiously as he could,and giving him the spurres as need required; mainly he galloppedinto a neere adjoyning Forrest, more minding the following ofAngelina, then any direction of way, or them that endeavoured to beehis hindrance. So that by often winding and turning about, as thepassage appeared troublesome to him, when he thought him selfe freeand furthest from them, he was round engirt, and seized on by them.When they had made him to dismount from his horse, questioning himof whence and what he was, and he resolving them therein, they fellinto a secret consultation, saying thus among themselves. This manis a friend to our deadly enemies, how can wee then otherwisedispose of him, but dreame him of all he hath, and in despight ofthe Orsini (men in nature hatefull to us) hang him up heere on oneof these Trees?

  • 王处存 08-09

       There they stept before him unto the Port, and acquainted theWarders with the whole matter, who laughing heartily at the jest,the better to upholde it; would seeme not to see Calandrino in hispassage by them, but suffered him to go on, sore wearied with hisburthen, and sweating extreamly. Without resting himselfe in anyplace, he came home to his house, which was neere to the corner of theMilles, Fortune being so favourable to him in the course of thismockery, that as he passed along the Rivers side, and afterwardthrough part of the City; he was neither met nor seen by any, inregard they were all in their houses at dinner.

  • 邓晓勇 08-07

    {  Some few miles distant from Florence, Beltramo had a Castle ofpleasure, and there his Lady Isabella used to live all Summer, asall other doe the like, being so possessed. On a day, Beltramo beingridden from home, and she having sent for Lionello, to take theadvantage of her Husbands absence; accordingly he went, not doubtingbut to winne what he had long expected. Signior Lambertuccio on theother side, meeting Beltramo riding from his Castle, and Isabellanow fit to enjoy his company: gallops thither with all possiblespeede, because hee would bee no longer delayed. Scarcely was Lionelloentred the Castle, and receiving directions by the waiting woman, toher Ladies Chamber: but Lambertuccio gallopped in at the Gate, whichthe woman perceiving, ranne presently and acquainted her Lady with thecomming of Lambertuccio.

  • 陈国海 08-07

      The Launce that won him Honour, hath me slaine,

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