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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马克安 大小:6LTh6z7l19280KB 下载:9dyefBdS81248次
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日期:2020-08-13 05:44:16
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Hereupon, he secretly called Jehannot before him, examining himparticularly of all his passed life, and finding (by most manifestarguments) that his name was truly Geoffrey, and the eldest son ofHenriet Capece, he spake thus to him. Jehannot, thou knowest how greatthe injuries are that thou hast done me, and my deere daughter; gentlyintreating thee (as became an honest servant) that thou shouldestalwayes have bene respective of mine honor, and all that appertaineunto me. There are many noble Gentlemen, who sustaining the wrongwhich thou hast offred me, they would have procured thy shamefulldeath, which pitty and compassion will not suffer in me. Whereforeseeing (as thou informest me) that thou art honourably derived both byfather and mother, I will give end to all thy anguishes, even when thyselfe art so pleased, releasing thee from that captivity wherein Ihave so long kept thee, and in one instant, reduce thine honor andmine into compleat perfection. As thou knowest my daughter Spina, whomthou hast embraced as a friend (although far unfitting for thee, orher) is a widdow, and her marriage is both great and good; what hermanners and conditions are, thou indifferently knowest, and art notignorant of her father and mother: concerning thine owne estate, asnow I purpose not to speake any thing. Therefore, when thou wilt, I amdetermined, that whereas thou hast immodestly affected her, sheshall become thy honest wife, and accepting thee as my sonne, toremaine with me so long as you both please.
2.  Master Chappelet still wept and sighed, and continued silent,notwithstanding all the Confessors comfortable perswasions; butafter hee had helde him a long while in suspence, breathing forth asighe, even as if his very heart would have broken, he saide; HolyFather, seeing you promise to pray to God for me, I will reveale it toyou: Know then, that when I was a little boy, I did once curse myMother; which he had no sooner spoken, but he wrung his hands, andgreeved extraordinarily. Oh good Son, saide the Friar: doth that seemeso great a sinne to thee? Why, men doe daily blaspheme our Lord God,and yet neverthelesse, upon their hearty repentance, he is alwayesready to forgive them; and wilt not thou beleeve to obtaine remission,for a sinne so ignorantly committed? Weepe no more deare Sonne, butcomfort thy selfe and rest resolved, that if thou wert one of them,who nayled our blessed Saviour to his Crosse; yet being so trulyrepentant, as I see thou art, he would freely forgive thee. Say you soFather? quoth Chappelet. What mine owne deare Mother? that bare mein her wombe nine moneths, day and night, and afterwards fed me withher breasts a thousand times, can I be pardoned for cursing her? Ohno, it is too haynous a sinne, and except you pray to God veryinstantly for me, he will not forgive me.
3.  John and she being gone to bed together, and the Maide likewise,it was not long after, before Frederigo came, and knocking once softlyat the doore, which was very neere to their lodging Chamber, Johnheard the noise, and so did his wife. But to the end, that Johnmight not have the least scruple of suspition, she seemed to be fastasleepe; and Frederigo pausing a while, according to the orderdirected, knockt againe the second time. John wondering thereat verymuch, jogd his wife a litle, and saide to her: Tessa, hearest thounothing? Methinkes one knocketh at our doore. Monna Tessa, who wasbetter acquainted with the knocke, then plaine honest meaning Johnwas, dissembling as if shee awaked out of a drowsie dreame, saide:Alas Husband, dost thou know what this is? In the name of ourblessed Ladie, be not affraid, this is but the Spirit which haunts ourCountrey houses, whereof I have often told thee, and it hath manytimes much dismayed me, living heere alone without thy comfort. Nay,such hath bin my feare, that in divers nights past, so soone as Iheard the knockes: I was feigne to hide my selfe in the beddeover-head and eares (as we usually say) never daring to be so bold, asto looke out, untill it was broad open day. Arise good wife (quothJohn) and if it be such a Spirit of the Countrey, as thou talkestof, never be affraid; for before we went to bed, I said the Telucis,the Intemerata, with many other good prayers beside. Moreover, Imade the signe of the Crosse at every corner of our bed, in the nameof the Father, Son, and holy Ghost, so that no doubt at all needs tobe made, of any power it can have to hurt or touch us.
4.  By this, and divers other like worthy deeds, not onely did he winthe hearts of his subjects; but gave occasion to the who world beside,to renowne his fame to all succeeding posterity. Whereto (in thesemore wretched times of ours) few or none bend the sway of theirunderstanding: but rather how to bee cruell and tyrranous Lords, andthereby win the hatred of their people.
5.  Onely one man among them all, named Bernardo Lomellino, and dwellingin Geneway, maintained the contrary; boldly avouching, that by theespeciall favour of Fortune, he had a wife so perfectly compleate inall graces and vertues, as any Lady in the world possibly could be,and that Italy scarsely contained her equall. But, she was goodly ofperson, and yet very young, quicke, quaint, milde, and courteous,and not any thing appertaining to the office of a wife, either fordomesticke affayres, or any other imployment whatsoever, but inwomanhoode shee went beyond all other. No Lord, Knight, Esquire, orGentleman, could bee better served at his Table, then himselfe daylywas, with more wisedome, modesty and discretion. After all this, heepraised her for riding, hawking, hunting, fishing, fowling, reading,writing, enditing, and most absolute keeping his Bookes of accounts,that neither himselfe, or any other Merchant could therein excell her.After infinite other commendations, he came to the former point oftheir argument, concerning the easie falling of women intowantonnesse, maintaining (with a solemne oath) that no womanpossibly could be more chaste and honest then she: in which respect,he was verily perswaded, that if he stayed from her ten years space(yea all his life time) out of his house; yet never would sheefalsifie her faith to him, or be lewdly allured by any other man.
6.  Constance hearing that she spake the Latine language so well;desired to know what she was. Whereto the old woman thus answered:Gentlewoman (quoth she) I am of Trapanum, named Carapresa, and am aservant in this Countrey to certaine Christian Fishermen. The youngMaiden (albeit she was very full of sorrow) hearing her name to beCarapresa, conceived it as a good augury to her selfe, and that shehad heard the name before, although she knew not what occasionshould move her thus to do. Now began her hopes to quicken againe, andyet she could not relie upon what ground; nor was she so desirous ofdeath as before, but made more precious estimation of her life, andwithout any further declaration of her selfe or Countrey, sheentreated the good woman (even for charities sake) to take pitty onher youth, and helpe her with such good advice, to prevent allinjuries which might happen to her, in such a solitary wofullcondition.

计划指导

1.  This counsell pleased the King very highly, and he being a Prince ofgreat understanding, gave order to have it accordingly followed, andthereby valiantly vanquished his enemies. Heereupon, Martuccio came tobe great in his grace, as also consequently rich, and seated in nomeane place of authority. Now as worthy and commendable actions aresoone spread abroad, in honor of the man by whom they hapned: evenso the fame of this rare got victory, was quickly noysed throughoutthe Countrey, and came to the hearing of poore Constance, thatMartuccio Gomito (whom she supposed so long since to be dead) wasliving, and in honourable condition. The love which formerly shebare unto him, being not altogether extinct in her heart; of a smallsparke, brake forth into a sodaine flame, and so encreased day by day,that her hope (being before almost quite dead) revived againe inchearfull manner.
2.  Thus poore Andrea is still made a property, and Fortune (this fatallnight) will have no other foole but he, as delighting in his hourlydisasters. Feare of their fury makes him obedient, into the grave hegoes, and being within, thus consults with himselfe. These cunningcompanions suppose me to be simple, and make me enter the Tombe,having an absolute intention to deceive me. For, when I have giventhem all the riches that I finde here, and am ready to come forthfor mine equall portion: away will they runne for their owne safety,and leaving me heere, not onely shall I loose my right among them, butmust remaine to what danger may follow after. Having thus meditated,he resolved to make sure of his owne share first, and remembring therich Ring, whereof they had tolde him: forthwith hee tooke it from theArchbishops finger, finding it indifferently fitte for his owne.Afterward, hee tooke the Crosse, Miter, rich garments, Gloves and all,leaving him nothing but his shirt, giving them all these severallparcels, protesting that there was nothing else. Still they pressedupon him, affirming that there was a Ring beside, urging him to searchdiligently for it; yet still he answered, that he could not findeit, and for their longer tarrying with him, seemed as if he serchedvery carefully, but all appeared to no purpose.
3.  Then calling for the glasse of water, which she had readily preparedthe day before, and powring it upon the heart lying in the Cup,couragiously advancing it to her mouth, she dranke it up every drop;which being done, she lay downe upon her bed, holding her Lovers heartfast in her hand, and laying it so neere to her owne as she could. Nowalthough her women knew not what water it was, yet when they had seeneher to quaffe it off in that manner, they sent word to the King, whomuch suspecting what had happened, went in all haste to hisDaughters Chamber, entring at the very instant, when she was laideupon her bed; beholding her in such passionate pangs, with tearesstreaming downe his reverend beard, he used many kinde words tocomfort her: when boldly thus she spake unto him. Father (quoth she)well may you spare these teares, because they are unfitting for you,and not any way desired by me; who but your selfe, hath seene anyman to mourne for his owne wilfull offence. Neverthelesse, if butthe least jot of that love do yet abide in you, whereof you havemade such liberall profession to me; let me obtaine this my verylast request, to wit, that seeing I might not privately enjoy thebenefit of Guiscardoes love, and while he lived, let yet (in death)one publike grave containe both our bodies, that death may affoord us,what you so cruelly in life denied us.
4.  My thoughts did speake, for thoughts be alwayes free,
5.  Beleeve me Buffalmaco, saide the Doctor, Bruno hath spoken nothingbut truth, for I am scarsely knowne heere in this City, where (for themost part) they are all grosse-witted people, rather then any jotjudicious: but I would thou hadst seene me among the Doctors, inmanner as I was wont to be. In troth Sir, replyed Buffalmaco, youare much more Learned then ever I imagined, in which respect, speakunto you as it becommeth me, to a man so excellent in wit andunderstanding: I dare assure you, that (without any faile) I witprocure you to be one of our Company.
6.  This beautiful Lady, beeing very modest and vertuously inclined, washighly affected by a Noble Baron of those parts, tearmed by the nameof Signior Ansaldo Gradense; a man of very great spirit, bountifull,active in Armes, and yet very affable and courteous, which causedhim to be the better respected. His love to this Lady wasextraordinary, hardly to bee contained within any moderate compasse,striving to bee in like manner affected of her: to which end, shewanted no daily solicitings, Letters, Ambassages and Love-tokens,all proving to no purpose.

推荐功能

1.  THE TENTH DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
2.  Well may you (Gentle Ladies) imagine, that this answere was not alittle welcome to the Provost; who, shrugging with conceyte of joy,presently thus replyed. I thanke you Madame Piccarda, and to tellyou true, I held it almost as that you could stand upon such longresistance, considering, it never so fortuned to mee with anieother. And I have many times saide to my selfe, that if women weremade of silver, they hardly could be worth a pennie, because there canscarsely one be found of so good allay, as to endure the test andessay. But let us breake off this frivolous conference, and resolveupon a conclusion; How, when and where we may safely meete together.Worthy Sir, answered Piccarda, your selfe may appoint the timewhensoever you please, because I have no Husband, to whom I shouldrender any account of my absence, or presence: but I am not providedof any place.
3.  Biancafiore, having thus received the five hundred Florines, theindiction of the Almanacke began to alter: and whereas (before)Salabetto could come see her whensoever he pleased, many occasions nowhappened, whereby he came seven times for once, and yet his entrancewas scarsely admitted, neither was his entertainment so affable, orhis cheare so bountifull, as in his former accesses thither. Moreover,when the time for repaiment was come, yea a moneth or two over-past,and he demanded to have his money; hee could have nothing but wordsfor paiment. Now he began to consider on the craft and cunning of thiswicked Woman, as also his owne shallow understanding, knowing he couldmake no proofe of his debt, but what her selfe listed to say, havingneither witnes, specialty, bill or bond to shew: which made hisfolly so shamefull to him, that he durst not complaine to anyperson, because he had received some advertisements before, whereto hewold by no means listen, and now should have no other amends, butpublike infamie, scorne and disgrace, which made him almost weary ofhis life, and much to bemoane his owne unhappinesse. He receivedalso divers Letters from his Master, to make returne of the 500Florines over by way of banke, according as he had used to do: butnowe could performe no such matter.
4.  But now (being dead) they all are gone, and wanting.
5.   Least (like my selfe) themselves do sigh too late.
6.  The Clearke comming to the house of Belcolore, found her sittingat dinner with her Husband, and delivering her the Pestell and Morter,performed the rest of Sir Simons message. Belcolore hearing the Cloakedemaunded, stept up to make answere: But Bentivegna, seeming (by hislookes) to be much offended, roughly replyed. Why how now wife? Is notSir Simon our especiall friend, and cannot he be pleasured without apawne? I protest upon my word, I could find in my heart to smitethee for it. Rise quickely thou wert best, and send him backe hisCloake; with this warning hereafter, that whatsoever he will have,be it your poore Asse, or any thing else being ours, let him haveit: and tell him (Master Clearke) he may command it. Belcolore rosegrumbling from the Table, and fetching the Cloake forth of theChest, which stood neere at hand in the same roome; shee deliveredit to the Clearke, saying. Tell Sir Simon from me, and boldly sayyou heard me speake it: that I make a vow to my selfe, he shallnever make use of my Morter hereafter, to beat any more of hissawcinesse in, let my Husband say whatsoever he will, I speake theword, and will performe it.

应用

1.  After many other, as wise and wholesome perswasions, which heconstantly credited, because they spake them, they reconciled him tohis wife, and she to him: but not without some difficulty in him;who falling into wonderfull greefe and melancholy, for losse of suchan admirable precious stone, was in danger to have dyed, withinlesse then a month after.
2.  The poore forsaken new married Countesse, could scarsely bepleased with such dishonourable unkindnesse, yet governing herimpatience with no meane discretion, and hoping by her vertuouscarriage, to compasse the meanes of his recall: home she rode toRoussillion, where all the people received her very lovingly. Now,by reason of the Counts so long absence, all things were there farreout of order; mutinies, quarrels, and civill dissentions, havingprocured many dissolute irruptions, to the expence of much blood inmany places. But she, like a jolly stirring Lady, very wise andprovident in such disturbances, reduced all occasions to such civilityagaine, that the people admired her rare behaviour, and condemnedthe Count for his unkindnesse towards her.
3.  After some indifferent respite of time, it chanced that the youngDamosel (who was named Iphigenia) awaked before any of the otherwith her, and lifted up her head, with her eyes wide open, she sawChynon standing before her, leaning still on his staffe; whereatmarvailing not a little, she saide unto him: Chynon, whither wanderestthou, or what dost thou seeke for in this wood? Chynon, who notonely by his countenance but likewise his folly, Nobility of birth,and wealthy possessions of his father, was generally knowne throughoutthe Countrey, made no answere at all to the demand of Iphigenia: butso soone as he beheld her eyes open, he began to observe them with aconstant regard, and being perswaded in his soule, that from themflowed such an unutterable singularity, as he had never felt tillthen. Which the young Gentlewoman well noting, she began to waxfearefull, least these stedfast lookes of his, should incite hisrusticity to some attempt, which might redound to her dishonour:wherefore awaking her women and servants, and they all being risen,she saide. Farewell Chynon, I leave thee to thine owne good Fortune;whereto hee presently replyed, saying: I will go with you. Now,although the Gentlewoman refused his company, as dreading some acte ofincivility from him: yet could she not devise any way to be rid ofhim, till he had brought her to her owne dwelling, where takingleave mannerly of her, he went directly home to his Fathers house,saying: Nothing should compell him to live any longer in the muddyCountry. And albeit his Father was much offended hereat, and all therest of his kindred and friends: (yet not knowing how to helpe it)they suffered him to continue there still, expecting the cause of thishis so sodaine alteration, from the course of life, which contentedhim so highly before.
4、  Within a while after, pretending to have some speech withGianetta, and holding the Gentleman still by the arme, the Physicioncaused her to be sent for; and immediately shee came. Upon her veryentrance into the Chamber, the pulse began to beate againe extreamely,and when shee departed, it presently ceased. Now was he thorowlyperswaded, that he had found the true effect of his sicknesse, whentaking the Father and mother aside, thus he spake to them. If you bedesirous of your Sons health, it consisteth not either in Physicion orphysicke, but in the mercy of your faire Maide Gianetta; formanifest signes have made it knowne to me, and he loveth theDamosell very dearely: yet (for ought I can perceive, the Maide dothnot know it:) now if you have respect of his life, you know (in thiscase) what is to be done. The Nobleman and his Wife hearing this,became somewhat satisfied, because there remained a remedy to preservehis life: but yet it was no meane griefe to them, if it should sosucceede, as they feared, namely, the marriage betweene this theirSonne and Gianetta.
5、  Theodoro falling in love with Violenta, the Daughter to hisMaster, named Amarigo, and she conceiving with child by him; wascondemned to be hanged. As they were leading him to the Gallowes,beating and misusing him all the way: he happened to be knowne ofhis owne Father, whereupon he was released, and afterward enjoyedViolenta in marriage.

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网友评论(QJlBPXHh85407))

  • 玛丽亚-格罗芙 08-12

      Thus rode on poore unfortunate Pedro, untill the breake of dayappeared, not finding any meanes to get forth of the Forrest, stillcrying and calling for his fayre friend, riding many timesbackeward, when as hee thought hee rode forward, untill hee becameso weake and faint, what with extreame feare, lowd calling, andcontinuing so long awhile without any sustenance, that the whole daybeing thus spent in vaine, and darke night sodainly come uppon him, hewas not able to hold out any longer.

  • 田青久 08-12

      But frailtie in our feminine sex is too much prevalent, and makes uswander from vertuous courses, when we are wel onward in the way tothem. Madam Beatrix, whatsoever passed betweene her and Anichino, Iknow not, but, either to continue this new begunne league forfurther time, or, to be revenged on her husbands implicity, inover-rashlie giving credit to so smooth a ly; this was her advise tohim. Anichino, quoth she, Take a good Cudgell in thy hand, then gointo the Garden so farre as the Pine; and there, as if formerly thouhadst solicited mee unto this secret meeting, only but by way ofapproving my honestie: in my name, revile thy master so bitterly asthou canst, bestowing manie sound blowes on him with thy cudgel; yeturge the shame stil (as it were) to mee, and never leave him, til thouhast beaten him out of the garden, to teach him keepe his bedanother time Such an apt Scholler as Anichino was in this kind,needs no tutoring, but a word is enough to a ready Wit. To theGarden goes he, with a good willow cudgell in his hand, and commingneere to the Pine-tree, there he found Egano disguised like to hisLady, who arising from the place where he sate, went with chearefullgesture to welcome him; but Anichino (in rough and stearne manner)thus spake unto him. Wicked shamelesse, and most immodest Woman, Artthou come, according to thine unchaste and lascivious promise?Couldest thou so easily credite, (though I tempted thee, to trie thevertue of thy continencie) I would offer such a damnable wrong to myworthy Master, that so deerely loves me, and reposeth his especiallconfidence in me? Thou art much deceived in me, and shalt finde,that I hate to be false to him.

  • 因扎吉 08-12

       Ruggiero having this benefite of the Maides kinde love to him,made it an hopefull mounting Ladder, whereby to derive some goodliking from the Mistresse, presuming rather on his outward comelyparts, then any other honest qualitie that might commend him. TheMistresse knowing what choise her Maide had made, and unable by anyperswasions to remoove her, tooke knowledge of Ruggieroes privateresorting to her house, and in meere love to her Maide (who had verymany especiall deservings in her) oftentimes she would (in kindemanner) rebuke him, and advise him to a more settled course of life;which counsell, that it might take the better effect; she gracedwith liberall gifts: one while with Golde, others with Silver, andoften with garments, for his comelier accesse thither; which bounty,he (like a lewde mistaker) interpreted as assurances of heraffection to him, and that he was more gracefull in her eye, thenany man else could be.

  • 吉比特 08-12

      Here am I now with a worthy Gentleman, that entertaineth me withvery honourable respect, and here I live in this Chamber, not somuch as hearing of any feasts or fasting dayes; for, neither Fridaies,Saturdaies, vigils of Saints, or any lingering Lent, enter at thisdoore: but heere is honest and civill conversation, better agreeingwith a youthfull disposition, then those harsh documents wherewith yoututord me. Wherefore my purpose is to continue here with him, as beinga place sutable to my minde and youth, referring feasts, vigils, andfasting daies, to a more mature and stayed time of age, when thebody is better able to endure them, and the mind may be prepared forsuch ghostly meditations: depart therefore at your owne pleasure,and make much of your Calender, without enjoying any company ofmine, for you heare my resolved determination.

  • 容础 08-11

    {  When they were come to the doore, Monna Tessa said to John: Thoumust cough and spet, at such time as I shall bid thee. Well (quothJohn) I will not faile you. Immediately she beganne her prayer in thismanner.

  • 圣恩 08-10

      What answer canst thou make, devill, and no man? What, have my wordssmitten thee dumbe? Thou mayest (with shame enough) hold thy peace,for with the face of a man, and love of an husband to his wife, thouart not able to make any answere.}

  • 程红已 08-10

      When the Gentlemen understood, that the Mayden was borne inFaenza, they marvelled thereat, and after they had thanked Jacominofor his curteous answer; they desired him to let them know, by whatmeanes the Damosell came into his custody, and how he knew her to beborne in Faenza: when hee, perceiving them attentive to heare him,began in this manner.

  • 邱彪 08-10

      But returning where I left (being led out of my way by a just andreligious anger against such deformity) this Gentleman, MasterGuillaume Boursier, was willingly seene, and gladly welcommed by allthe best men in Geneway. Having remained some few daies in the City,and amongst other matters, heard much talke of the miserablecovetousnesse of master Herminio, he grew very desirous to have asight of him. Master Herminio had already understood, that thisGentleman, Master Guillaume Boursier was vertuously disposed, and (howcovetously soever hee was inclined) having in him some sparkes ofnoble nature, gave him very good words, and gracious entertainment,discoursing with him on divers occasions.

  • 韩正 08-09

       Soone after, it being plainely discerned on either side, that theone was as well contented with these walkes, as the other could be:she desired to enflame him a little further, by a more liberallillustration of her affection towards him, when time and placeaffoorded convenient opportunity. To the holy Father againe shewent, (for she had beene too long from shrift) and kneeling downe athis feete, intended to begin her confession in teares; which the Friarperceiving, sorrowfully demanded of her; what accident had happened?Holy Father (quoth shee) no novell accident, only your wicked andungracious friend, by whom (since I was heere with you, yea, no longeragoe then yesterday) I have been so wronged, as I verily beleevethat he was borne to bee my mortall enemy, and to make me dosomthing to my utter disgrace for ever; and whereby I shall not dareto be seene any more of you my deare Father. How is this? answered theFriar, hath he not refrained from afflicting you so abusively?

  • 南怀瑾 08-07

    {  So a good wife and bad wife, a wand will make stirre.

  • 刘顺妮 08-07

      Deare heart, all my duty is performed to thee, and nothing nowremaineth uneffected; but onely breathing my last, to let my ghostaccompany thine.

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