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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘裕国 大小:MgjTjl1C58355KB 下载:r5a4XYuA36572次
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日期:2020-08-09 05:45:53
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Go to the house, and kill the best pig that you can find fordinner. Meanwhile I want to see whether my father will know me, orfail to recognize me after so long an absence."
2.  Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."
3.  "Have we any idea, Antinous, on what day Telemachus returns fromPylos? He has a ship of mine, and I want it, to cross over to Elis:I have twelve brood mares there with yearling mule foals by their sidenot yet broken in, and I want to bring one of them over here and breakhim."
4.  Telemachus did as his father said, and went off to the store roomwhere the armour was kept. He chose four shields, eight spears, andfour brass helmets with horse-hair plumes. He brought them with allspeed to his father, and armed himself first, while the stockman andthe swineherd also put on their armour, and took their places nearUlysses. Meanwhile Ulysses, as long as his arrows lasted, had beenshooting the suitors one by one, and they fell thick on one another:when his arrows gave out, he set the bow to stand against the end wallof the house by the door post, and hung a shield four hides thickabout his shoulders; on his comely head he set his helmet, wellwrought with a crest of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it,and he grasped two redoubtable bronze-shod spears.
5.  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."
6.  To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."

计划指导

1.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
2.  Meanwhile Agelaus son of Damastor, Eurynomus, Amphimedon,Demoptolemus, Pisander, and Polybus son of Polyctor bore the bruntof the fight upon the suitors' side; of all those who were stillfighting for their lives they were by far the most valiant, for theothers had already fallen under the arrows of Ulysses. Agelaus shoutedto them and said, "My friends, he will soon have to leave off, forMentor has gone away after having done nothing for him but brag.They are standing at the doors unsupported. Do not aim at him all atonce, but six of you throw your spears first, and see if you cannotcover yourselves with glory by killing him. When he has fallen we neednot be uneasy about the others."
3.  "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."
4.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
5.  Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.
6.  "Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them someacorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried backto tell me about the sad fate of our comrades. He was so overcome withdismay that though he tried to speak he could find no words to doso; his eyes filled with tears and he could only sob and sigh, till atlast we forced his story out of him, and he told us what hadhappened to the others.

推荐功能

1.  BOOK XIII.
2.  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
3.  Ulysses made no answer, but bowed his head and brooded. Then a thirdman, Philoetius, joined them, who was bringing in a barren heiferand some goats. These were brought over by the boatmen who are thereto take people over when any one comes to them. So Philoetius made hisheifer and his goats secure under the gatehouse, and then went up tothe swineherd. "Who, Swineherd," said he, "is this stranger that islately come here? Is he one of your men? What is his family? Wheredoes he come from? Poor fellow, he looks as if he had been somegreat man, but the gods give sorrow to whom they will- even to kingsif it so pleases them
4.  The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."
5.   "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."
6.  "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."

应用

1.  "I will tell Penelope," answered Ulysses, "nothing but what isstrictly true. I know all about her husband, and have been partnerwith him in affliction, but I am afraid of passing. through this crowdof cruel suitors, for their pride and insolence reach heaven. Justnow, moreover, as I was going about the house without doing anyharm, a man gave me a blow that hurt me very much, but neitherTelemachus nor any one else defended me. Tell Penelope, therefore,to be patient and wait till sundown. Let her give me a seat close upto the fire, for my clothes are worn very thin- you know they are, foryou have seen them ever since I first asked you to help me- she canthen ask me about the return of her husband."
2.  "Fall to, stranger," said he, "on a dish of servant's pork. Thefat pigs have to go to the suitors, who eat them up without shame orscruple; but the blessed gods love not such shameful doings, andrespect those who do what is lawful and right. Even the fiercefree-booters who go raiding on other people's land, and Jove givesthem their spoil- even they, when they have filled their ships and gothome again live conscience-stricken, and look fearfully for judgement;but some god seems to have told these people that Ulysses is deadand gone; they will not, therefore, go back to their own homes andmake their offers of marriage in the usual way, but waste his estateby force, without fear or stint. Not a day or night comes out ofheaven, but they sacrifice not one victim nor two only, and theytake the run of his wine, for he was exceedingly rich. No othergreat man either in Ithaca or on the mainland is as rich as he was; hehad as much as twenty men put together. I will tell you what he had.There are twelve herds of cattle upon the mainland, and as many flocksof sheep, there are also twelve droves of pigs, while his own menand hired strangers feed him twelve widely spreading herds of goats.Here in Ithaca he runs even large flocks of goats on the far end ofthe island, and they are in the charge of excellent goatherds. Eachone of these sends the suitors the best goat in the flock every day.As for myself, I am in charge of the pigs that you see here, and Ihave to keep picking out the best I have and sending it to them."
3.  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.
4、  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
5、  Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.

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网友评论(FlXEg65362000))

  • 迪维尔 08-08

      Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."

  • 卢锐 08-08

      "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."

  • 扶明高 08-08

       "'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'

  • 程平 08-08

      Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.

  • 法布罗比拉里萨-里克尔梅 08-07

    {  With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.

  • 巴加德 08-06

      AND ULYSSES answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear abard with such a divine voice as this man has. There is nothing betteror more delightful than when a whole people make merry together,with the guests sitting orderly to listen, while the table is loadedwith bread and meats, and the cup-bearer draws wine and fills hiscup for every man. This is indeed as fair a sight as a man can see.Now, however, since you are inclined to ask the story of my sorrows,and rekindle my own sad memories in respect of them, I do not know howto begin, nor yet how to continue and conclude my tale, for the handof heaven has been laid heavily upon me.}

  • 叶贝茜 08-06

      "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."

  • 罗利 08-06

      WHEN the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suitedhis hands, for he wanted to go into the city. "Old friend," said he tothe swineherd, "I will now go to the town and show myself to mymother, for she will never leave off grieving till she has seen me. Asfor this unfortunate stranger, take him to the town and let him begthere of any one who will give him a drink and a piece of bread. Ihave trouble enough of my own, and cannot be burdened with otherpeople. If this makes him angry so much the worse for him, but Ilike to say what I mean."

  • 袁枚 08-05

       "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.

  • 周华杰 08-03

    {  "Sir, and all of you, farewell. Make your drink-offerings and sendme on my way rejoicing, for you have fulfilled my heart's desire bygiving me an escort, and making me presents, which heaven grant that Imay turn to good account; may I find my admirable wife living in peaceamong friends, and may you whom I leave behind me give satisfaction toyour wives and children; may heaven vouchsafe you every good grace,and may no evil thing come among your people."

  • 皮克勒 08-03

      "When I had got the men together I said to them, 'You think youare about to start home again, but Circe has explained to me thatinstead of this, we have got to go to the house of Hades andProserpine to consult the ghost of the Theban prophet Teiresias.'

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