0 电子游戏免费注册送28元-APP安装下载

电子游戏免费注册送28元 注册最新版下载

电子游戏免费注册送28元 注册

电子游戏免费注册送28元注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张伯苓 大小:l4a62WLP28869KB 下载:8tdhvqof12151次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:rmG29Yvn27655条
日期:2020-08-09 05:50:36
安卓
涂松岩

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Madame Fiametta being come to the end of her Novell, and the greatmagnificence of King Charles much commended (howbeit, some of theCompany, affecting the Ghibelline faction, were otherwise minded)Madame Pampinea, by order given from the King, began in this manner.
2.  My sicknesse health, my tortures sweet repose;
3.  Now, over and beside all these admirable qualities, hee hath maniemore such singularities, which (in favour towards him) I am faine toconceale. But that which I smile most at in him, is, that he wouldhave a Wife in every place where he commeth, yea, and a good houseto boot too: for, in regard his beard beginneth to shew it selfe,rising thicke in haire, blacke and amiable, he is verily perswaded,that all Women will fall in love with him; and if they refuse tofollow him, he will in all hast run after them. But truly, he is anotable servant to mee, for I cannot speake with any one, and in neverso great secrecy, but he will be sure to heare his part; and whenany question is demanded of me, he standes in such awe and feare of mydispleasure: that he will bee sure to make the first answer, yea orno, according as he thinketh it most convenient.
4.  Dioneus having ended this his Tale, for which the Ladies returnedhim no thankes, but rather angerly frowned on him: the Queene, knowingthat her government was now concluded, arose, and taking off herCrowne of Lawrell, placed it graciously on the head of Madame Eliza,saying. Now Madame, it is your turne to commaund. Eliza havingreceived the honour, did (in all respects) as others formerly haddone, and after shee had enstructed the Master of the Houshold,concerning his charge during the time of her Regiment, forcontentation of all the company; thus shee spake.
5.  Having found out the place where she dwelt, he began (as it is thecustome of yong Lovers) to use divers daily walkes by her doore: asthinking in his minde, that her remembrance of him was constantlycontinued, as his was most intirely fixed on her. But the case wasvery strangely altred, because she was now growne no more mindfullof him, then if she had never seene him before. Or if she did anyway remember him, it appeared to be so little, that manifest signesdeclared the contrary. Which Jeronimo very quickely perceived,albeit not without many melancholly perturbations. Notwithstanding, helaboured by all possible meanes, to recover her former kindnesseagaine: but finding all his paines frivolously employed; he resolvedto dye, and yet to compasse some speech with her before.
6.  Faire Simonida affecting Pasquino, and walking with him in apleasant garden, it fortuned, that Pasquino rubbed his teeth with aleafe of Sage, and immediately fell downe dead. Simonida being broughtbefore the bench of Justice, and charged with the death of Pasquino,she rubbed her teeth likewise with one of the leaves of the same Sage,as declaring what shee saw him do, and thereon she dyed also in thesame manner.

计划指导

1.  In Tuscanie there was sometime an Abbey, seated, as now we seecommonly they are, in a place not much frequented with people, andthereof a Monke was Abbot, very holy and curious in all things else,save onely a wanton appetite to women: which yet he kept so cleanly tohimselfe, that though some did suspect it, yet it was knowne to veryfew. It came to passe, that a rich Country Franklin, named Ferando,dwelt as neere neighbour to the said Abby, he being a man materiall,of simple and grosse understanding, yet he fell into great familiaritywith the Abbot; who made use of this friendly conversation to no otherend, but for divers times of recreation; when he delighted to smile athis silly and sottish behaviour.
2.  This window, which we now looke forth at, sheweth thee a smal woodor thicket of trees, being litle more then the quarter of a milesdistance hence; whereto Nathan usually walketh every morning, andthere continueth time long enough: there maist thou very easily meethim, and do whatsoever thou intendest to him. If thou kilst him,because thou maist with safety returne home unto thine owne abiding,take not the same way which guided thee thither, but another, lying onthe left hand, and directing speedily out of the wood, as being not somuch haunted as the other, but rather free from all resort, and surestfor visiting thine owne countrey, after such a dismall deed is done.
3.  Even at the instant Sir, as we met with you, I had determined inmy mind, to send one of my servants somewhat neere to Pavia, about abusinesse concerning my selfe: he shall go along with you, and conductyou to a place, where you will be very well entertayned. So,stepping to him, who was of best discretion amongst his men, he gaveorder to him what should bee done, and sent him with them. Himselfe,making hast by a farre neerer way, caused Supper to be prepared inworthy manner, and the Tables to be covered in his Garden; and allthings being in good readinesse, he sate downe at his doore, to attendthe comming of his guests. The Servingman, discoursing with theGentlemen on divers occasions, guided them by such unusuallpassages, as (before they could discerne it) he brought them to hisMasters house; where so soone as Thorello saw them arrived, he wentforth to meet them, assuring them all of most hearty welcome.
4.  The Chamber-maide, being much moved to compassion, returned to herLady, and tolde her all; she likewise pittying his distresse, andremembring shee had the key of that doore, whereby the Marquesseboth entred and returned, when he intended not to be seene of any,said to her Maide. Goe, and open the doore softly for him; we have agood supper, and none to helpe to eate it, and if he be a manlikely, we can allow him one nights lodging too. The Chamber-maide,commending her Lady for this charitable kindnesse, opened the doore,and seeing hee appeared as halfe frozen, shee said unto him. Make hastgood man, get thee into this Bath, which yet is good and warme, for myLady her selfe came but newly out of it. Whereto very gladly hecondiscended, as not tarrying to be bidden twise; finding himselfeso singularly comforted with the heate thereof, even as if hee hadbeene restored from death to life. Then the Lady sent him garments,which lately were her deceased husbands, and fitted him so aptly inall respects, as if purposely they had beene made for him.
5.  So they left the house, filled with blood, teares, and outcries,going on together, without any hinderance, and so brought both theBrides aboord the ship, which they rowed away instantly with theirOares. For, now the shore was full of armed people, who came in rescueof the stolne Ladies: but all in vaine, because they were lanched intothe main, and sayled on merrily towards Candye. Where being arrived,they were worthily entertained by honourable Friends and Kinsmen,who pacified all unkindnesses betweene them and their Mistresses: And,having accepted them in lawfull marriage, there they lived in no meanejoy and contentment: albeit there was a long and troublesomedifference (about these rapes) betweene Rhodes and Cyprus.
6.  THE MANIFOLD MUTABILITIES OF FORTUNE

推荐功能

1.  These things, and many more (fitter for silence, then forpublication) were so deepely displeasing to the Jew, being a mostsober and modest man; that he had soone seene enough, resolving on hisreturne to Paris, which very speedily he performed. And whenJehannot heard of his arrivall, crediting much rather other newes fromhim, then ever to see him a converted Christian; he went to welcomehim, and kindly they feasted one another. After some few dayes ofresting, Jehannot demanded of him; what he thought of our holyFather the Pope and his Cardinals, and generally of all the otherCourtiers? Whereto the Jew readily answered; It is strange Jehannot,that God should give them so much as he doth. For I will truely tellthee, that if I had beene able to consider all those things, whichthere I have both heard and seene: I could then have resolved myselfe, never to have found in any Priest, either sanctity, devotion,good worke, example of honest life, or any good thing else beside. Butif a man desire to see luxury, avarice, gluttony, and such wickedthings, yea, worse, if worse may be, and held in generall estimationof all men; let him but goe to Rome, which I thinke rather to be theforge of damnable actions, then any way leaning to grace or goodnesse.And, for ought I could perceive, me thinkes your chiefe Pastour, and(consequently) all the rest of his dependants, doe strive so much asthey may (with all their engine arte and endevour) to bring tonothing, or else to banish quite out of the world, Christian Religion,whereof they should be the support and foundation.
2.  Yet perhaps this is not a matter so easily done, or I to expressesuch liberality therein, if wives were to be found with the likedifficultie, as true and faithfull friends are: but, (being able torecover another wife) though never such a worthy friend; I ratherchuse to change, I doe not say loose her (for in giving her to thee, Iloose her not my selfe) and by this change, make that which was goodbefore, tenne times better, and so preserve both thee and my selfe. Tothis end therefore, if my prayers and perswasions have any powerwith thee, I earnestly entreat thee, that, by freeing thy selfe out ofthis affliction, thou wilt (in one instant) make us both truelycomforted, and dispose thy selfe (living in hope) to embrace thathappinesse, which the fervent love thou bearest to Sophronia, hathjustly deserved.
3.  A physitians wife laide a Lover of her Maides (supposing him to bedead) in a Chest, by reason that he had drunke Water, which usuallywas given to procure a sleepy entrancing. Two Lombard usurers,stealing the Chest, in hope of a rich booty, carryed it into theirowne house, where afterward the man awaking, was apprehended for aTheefe. The Chamber-maide to the Physitians wife, going before thebench of Justice, accuseth her selfe for putting the imagined deadbody into the Chest, by which meanes he escapeth hanging. And thetheeves which stole away the Chest, were condemned to pay a greatsumme of money.
4.  Madam Philomena having finished her discourse, the Queeneperceiving, that her turne was the next, in regard of the priviledgegranted to Dioneus; with a smiling countenance thus she spake. Nowor never am I to maintaine the order which was instituted when weebegan this commendable exercise, whereto I yeeld with all humbleobedience. And (worthy Ladies) I am to acquaint you with a Novell,in some sort answerable to the precedent, not onely to let you know,how powerfully your kindnesses do prevalle, in such as have a free andgentle soule: but also to dvise you, in being bountifull, where vertuedoth justly challenge it. And evermore, let your favours shine onworthy deservers, without the direction of chaunce or Fortune, whonever bestoweth any gift by discretion; but rashly withoutconsideration, even to the first she blindly meets withall.
5.   Sometime there dwelt in Florence a young Gentleman, namedTheobaido Elisei, descended of a noble House, who became earnestlyenamoured of a Widdow, called Hermelina, the daughter toAldobrandino Palermini: well deserving, for his vertues andcommendable qualities, to enjoy of her whatsoever he could desire.Secretly they were espoused together, but Fortune, the enemy to Loversfelicities, opposed her malice against them, in depriving Theobaldo ofthose deere delights, which sometime he held in free possession, andmaking him as a stranger to her gracious favours. Now grew sheecontemptibly to despise him, not onely denying to heare any messagesent from him, but scorning also to vouch safe so much as a sight ofhim, causing in him extreme griefe and melancholy, yet concealling allher unkindnesse so wisely to himselfe, as no one could understandthe reason of his sadnesse.
6.  When the next foode was sent to Ferando, so much of the powder wasmingled with the wine, as would serve onely for foure houresentrauncing, in which time, they clothed him in his owne wearingapparell againe, the Abbot himselfe in person, and his honest trustyMonke of Bologna, conveying and laying him in the same vault under theTombe, where at the first they gave him buriall. The next morningfollowing, the breake of day, Ferando recovered his senses, and thorowdivers chinkes and crannies of the Tombe, descried daylight, which heehad not see in tenne moneths space before. Perceiving then plainely,that he was alive, he cryed out aloude, saying: Open, open, and letmee forth of Purgatory, for I have beene heere long enough inconscience. Thrusting up his head against the cover of the Tombe,which was not of any great strength, neither well closed together; heeput it quite off the Tombe, and so got forth upon his feete: atwhich instant time, the Monks having ended their morning Mattins,and hearing the noyse, ran in hast thither, and knowing the voyce ofFerando, saw that he was come forth of the Monument.

应用

1.  Master Simon the Physitian, by the perswasions of Bruno, Buffalmaco,and a third Companion, named Nello, made Calandrino to beleeve, thathe was conceived great with childe. And having Physicke ministred tohim for the disease: they got both good fatte Capons and money of him,and so cured him, without any other man of deliverance.
2.  So, sweetly kissing her infinitely, and hugging her joyfully inhis armes (the teares now streaming like new-let-loose Rivers, downeher faire face, which no disaster before could force from her) heebrought her, and seated her by her daughter, who was not a littleamazed at so rare an alteration. Shee having in zeale of affection)kissed and embraced them both, all else there present being clearelyresolved from the former doubt which too long deluded them; the ladiesarose jocondly from the tables, and attending on Grizelda to herChamber, in signe of a more successfull augury to follow, tooke offher poor contemptible rags, and put on such costly robes, which (asLady Marchionesse) she used to weare before.
3.  Varro was amazed, to observe with what earnest instance each of themstrove to excuse the other, which halfe perswaded him in his soule,that they were both guiltlesse. And as he was starting-up, with fullintent to acquaint them: a yong man, who had stood there all thiswhile, and observed the hard pleading on either side; he crowdedinto the Barre, being named Publius Ambustus, a fellow of lewd life,and utterly out of hopes, as being debauched in all his fortunes,and knowne among the Romaines to be a notorious theefe, who verily hadcommitted the murder. Well knew his conscience, that none of them wereguilty of the crime, wherewith each so wilfully charged himselfe:being therefore truely toucht with remorse, he stept before MarcusVarro, saying.
4、  Messer Antonio d'Orso, being Byshoppe of Florence, a vertuous, wise,and reverend Prelate; it fortuned that a Gentleman of Catalogna, namedMesser Diego de la Ratta, and Lord Marshall to King Robert ofNaples, came thither to visite him. Hee being a man of very comelypersonage, and a great observer of the choysest beauties in Court:among all the other Florentine Dames, one proved to bee mostpleasing in his eye, who was a verie faire Woman indeede, and Neece tothe Brother of the saide Messer Antonio.
5、  Andrea, being some what pacified with these speeches, ashagge-hayr'd swash-buckler, a grim visagde Ruffian (as sildomebawdy houses are without such swaggering Champions) not seene or heardby Andrea, all the while of his being in the house; rapping out two orthree terrible Oathes, opening a Casement, and with a stearnedreadfull voyce, demanded, who durst keepe that noyse beneath?Andrea fearefully looking up, and (by a little glimmering of theMoone) seeing such a rough fellow, with a blacke beard, strowting likethe quilles of a Porcupine, and patches on his face, for hurtsreceived in no honest quarrels, yawning also and stretching, asangry to have his sleepe disturbed: trembling and quaking, answered; Iam the Gentlewomans brother of the house. The Ruffian interruptinghim, and speaking more fiercely then before; sealing his words withhorrible Oathes, said. Sirra, Rascall, I know not of whence, or whatthou art; but if I come downe to thee, I will so bumbast thy pratingCoxecombe, as thou wast never so beaten in all thy life, like adrunken slave and beast as thou art, that all this night wilt notlet us sleepe. And so hee clapt to the window againe.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(oYCAawHT68480))

  • 张佳怡 08-08

      Both shee and other Gentlewomen, perceiving the occasion of hispassing and repassing; would privately jest thereat together, to see aman of such yeares and discretion, to be amorously addicted, oroverswayed by effeminate passions. For they were partly perswaded,that such wanton Ague fits of Love, were fit for none but youthfullapprehensions, as best agreeing with their chearefull complexion.Master Albert continuing his dayly walkes by the widdowes lodging,it chaunced upon a Feastivall day, that shee (accompanied withdivers other women of great account) being sitting at her doore;espied Master Albert (farre off) comming thitherward, and a resolveddetermination among themselves was set downe, to allow himfavourable entertainement, and to jest (in some merry manner) at hisloving folly, as afterward they did indeede.

  • 钱锡良 08-08

      SUCH HUSBANDS, AS LEAVE THEM ALONE TO THEIR OWNE DISPOSITION

  • 张晶晶 08-08

       Many Novels (gracious Ladies) do offer themselves to my memory,wherewith to beginne so pleasant a day, as it is her Highnessedesire that this should be: among which plenty, I esteeme one aboveall the rest, because you may comprehend thereby, not onely thefortunate conclusion, wherewith we intend to begin our day; butalso, how mighty the forces of Love are, deserving to be bothadmired and reverenced. Albeit there are many, who scarsely knowingwhat they say, do condemne them with infinite grosse imputations:which I purpose to disprove, and (I hope) to your no little pleasing.

  • 弘邦 08-08

      THAT PROVES TO BE OVERSAWCY WITH HIS MASTER

  • 邓姑 08-07

    {  IN SOME EVIDENT DANGER

  • 涅瓦 08-06

      OF HIMSELFE, AND HIS TRUE HONOUR}

  • 徐建文 08-06

      Heere you are to observe, that Magdalena (beeing a very beautifullWoman, yong, and in the choisest flower of her time:) had often beforebene solicited by the Duke, to entertaine his love and kindnesse:whereto by no meanes she would listen or give consent. And being nowmost earnestly importuned by her for the safetie of her Sisterslife, hee tooke hold on this her dayly suite to him, and in privatetold her, that if she was so desirous of Ninettaes life: it lay in herpower to obtain it, by granting him the fruition of her love. Sheapparantly perceiving that Ninetta was not likely to live, but bythe prostitution of her chaste honour, which she preferred beforethe losse of her owne life, or her sisters, concluded to let her dye,rather then run into any such disgrace. But having an excellentingenious wit, quicke, and apprehensive in perillous occasions, sheintended now to make a triall of overreaching the lascivious Duke inhis wanton purpose, and yet to be assured of her sisters life, withoutany blemish to her reputation.

  • 杨茂荣 08-06

      Abraham a Jew, being admonished or advised by a friend of his,named Jehannot de Chevigny, travailed from Paris unto Rome: Andbeholding there the wicked behaviour of men in the Church, returnedbacke to Paris againe, where yet (neverthelesse) he became aChristian.

  • 李镐澈 08-05

       Talano de Molese dreamed, That a Wolfe rent and tore his wivesface and throate. Which dreame he told to her, with advise to keepeher selfe out of danger; which she refusing to doe, received whatfollowed.

  • 安世民 08-03

    {  His daughter Violenta, clouded under the borrowed name ofGianetta, dwelling with the Lady at London, grew so in yeares, beauty,comelinesse of person, and was so gracefull in the favour of herLord and Lady, yea, of every one in the house beside, that it waswonderfull to behold. Such as but observed her usuall carriage, andwhat modesty shined clearely in her eyes, reputed her well worthy ofhonourable preferment; in regard, the Lady that had received her ofher Father, not knowing of whence, or what shee was; but as himselfehad made report, intended to match her in honourable marriage,according as her vertues worthily deserved. But God, the just rewarderof all good endeavours, knowing her to be noble by birth, and(causelesse) to suffer for the sinnes of another; disposed otherwiseof her: and that so worthy a Virgin might be no mate for a man ofill conditions, no doubt ordained what was to be done, according tohis owne good pleasure.The Noble Lady, with whom poore Gianetta dwelt, had but one onelySonne by her Husband, and he most deerely affected of them both, aswell in regard he was to be their heire, as also for his vertues andcommendable qualities, wherein he excelled many young Gentlemen.Endued he was with heroycall valour, compleate in all perfections ofperson, and his minde every way answerable to his outward behaviour,exceeding Gianetta about sixe yeeres in age. Hee perceiving her tobe a faire and comely Maiden, grew to affect her so entirely, that allthings else he held contemptible, and nothing pleasing in his eyebut shee. Now, in regard her parentage was reputed poore, he kepthis love concealed from his Parents, not daring to desire her inmarriage: for loath he was to loose their favour, by disclosing thevehemency of his afflictions, which proved a greater torment to him,then if it had beene openly knowne.

  • 施向辉 08-03

      Such Ladies as in Love are bravely bold,

提交评论