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2020-08-05 08:06:20  Դձ
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HEEREIN ALL MEN ARE ADMONISHED, NEVER TO DISTRUST THE POWERFULL

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It is no disgrace to them to be Gowty; because when other men knowit not, they alledge, that strict fasting, feeding on grosse Meates(though never so little,) continuall studying, and such likerestraints from the bodies freer exercise, maketh them subject to manyinfirmities. And yet, when any one of them chanceth to fall sicke, thePhysitian must minister no such counsell to them, as Chastity,Abstinence from voluptuous meats, Discipline of the body, or any ofthose matters appertaining to a modest religious life. For, concerningthe plaine, vulgar, and Plebeian people, these holy Fathers areperswaded, that they know nothing really belonging to asanctimonious life; as long watching, praying, discipline and fasting,which (in themselves) are not able, to make men look leane,wretched, and pale. Because Saint Dominicke, Saint Fraunces, anddivers other holy Saints beside, observed the selfesame religiousorders and constitutions, as now their carefull successors do.Moreover, in example of those fore-named Saints, who went welcloathed, though they had not three Garments for one, nor made ofthe finest Woollen excellent cloath: but rather of the very coarsestof all other, and of the common ordinary colour, to expell cold onely,but not to appear brave or gallant, deceyving thereby infinitesimple credulous soules, whose purses (neverthelesse) are their bestpay-masters.

Calandrino threw wanton glances at her, and seeing she was bothfaire and lovely, began to finde some occasion of tarrying, so that hereturned not with water to his other associates, yet neither knowingher, or daring to deliver one word. She, who was not to learn herlesson in alluring, noting what affectionate regards (withbashfulnesse) he gave her: answered him more boldly with the like; butmeerly in scorning manner, breathing forth divers dissembled sighsamong them: so that Calandrino became foolishly inveigled with herlove, and would not depart out of the Court, until Phillippo, standingabove in his Chamber window called her thence.

The men of Rhodes, being rather constrained thereto, then of anyfree disposition in themselves, with teares in their eyes, deliveredIphigenia to Chynon; who beholding her in like manner to weepe, thusspake unto her. Noble Lady, do not any way discomfort your selfe,for I am your Chynon, who have more right and true title to you, andmuch better doe deserve to enjoy you, by my long continued affectionto you, then Pasimondo can any way plead; because you belong to himbut onely by promise. So, bringing her aboord his owne ship, where theGentlemen his companions gave her kinde welcome, without touchingany thing else belonging to the Rhodians, he gave them free liberty todepart.

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My torments still encreased in this kinde,

OF ANOTHER, WHEN HEE COMPASSETH CRAFT TO DEFEND HIMSELFE

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Nor grew this familiarity (as yet) any way distasted, till bytheir daily conversing together, and enterchange of infinite prettyspeeches, Jeronimo felt a strange alteration in his soule, with suchenforcing and powerfull afflictions; as he was never well but in hercompany, nor she enjoyed any rest if Jeronimo were absent. At thelength, this being noted by his Mother, she began to rebuke him, yeamany times gave him both threatnings and blowes, which proving to nopurpose, not hindering his accesse to her; she complained to hisTutors, and like one that in regard of her riches, thought to plant anOrange upon a blacke thorne, spake as followeth.

Messer Guiglielmo Rossiglione, alighting from his horse, andhaving a keene knife ready drawne in his hand; opened therewith thebrest of dead Guardastagno, and taking foorth his heart with hisowne hands, wrapped it in the Bandelote belonging to his Lance,commanding one of his men to the charge thereof, and never to disclosethe deed. So, mounting on horse-backe againe, and darke nightdrawing on apace, he returned home to his Castle. The Lady, who hadheard before of Guardastagnoes intent, to suppe there that night,and (perhaps) being earnestly desirous to see him; marvailing at hisso long tarrying, saide to her husband: Beleeve me Sir (quoth she)me thinkes it is somewhat strange, that Messer Guiglielmo Guardastagnodelayes his comming so long, he never used to do so till now. Ireceived tidings from him wife (saide he) that he cannot be heretill to morrow. Whereat the Lady appearing to be displeased, concealedit to herselfe, and used no more words.

I know Gossip, that it is a matter of common and ordinary custome,for Ladies and Gentlewomen to be graced with favourites, men of fraileand mortall conditions, whose natures are as subject to inconstancy,as their very best endevours dedicated to folly, as I could name nomean number of our Ladies heere in Venice. But when Soveraigne deitiesshall feele the impression of our humane desires, and beholdsubjects of such prevailing efficacy, as to subdue their greatestpower, yea, and make them enamored of mortall creatures: you maywell imagine Gossip, such a beauty is superiour to any other. And suchis the happy fortune of your friend Lisetta, of whose perfections,great Cupid the awefull commanding God of Love himselfe, conceivedsuch an extraordinary liking: as he hath abandoned his seate ofsupreme Majesty, and appeared to in the shape of a mortall man, withlively expression of his amourous passions, and what extremities ofanguish he hath endured, onely for my love. May this be possible?replied the Gossip. Can the Gods be toucht with the apprehension ofour fraile passions? True it is Gossip, answered and so certainlytrue, that his sacred kisses, sweete embraces, and most pleasingspeeches with proffer of his continuall devotion towards me, hathgiven me good cause to confirme what I say, and to thinke myfelicity farre beyond all other womens, being honoured with hisoften nightly visitations.

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<"I will prove it so sufficiently," says he, that you shall all bethoroughly convinced. Gentlemen," says he, "by how much a family ismost ancient by so much it is most noble. The family of the Baronchiis the most ancient in Florence, ergo it is the most noble. I havenothing, then, to prove but the antiquity of the Baronchi. This willappear in that Prometheus made them at the time that he first began tolearn to paint, and made others after he was master of his art. Toconvince you of this, do but examine the figures of the one and theother: you'll find art and proportion in the composition of the one,whereas the others are but rough-drawn and imperfect. Among theBaronchi you'll meet with one with a long narrow face, another witha prodigiously broad one; one is flat-nosed, another has a nose thatmeasures an ell; one has a long chin and jaws like an ass, another hashis short and flat, and is monkey-faced. Nay, there are some of themthat have but one eye either larger or lower than the others have.In a word, their faces for all the world resemble such as childrenmake when they first begin to draw. Prometheus, you will allow, mustbe no great master when he made these figures, as I told you before;and consequently they must be more noble as they are more ancient."Now grew the Muletter extreamely angry, giving her many cruellstroakes, on the head, sides, flancks and all parts else, but yet theyproved to no purpose, which Melisso and Giosefo seeing, and being(by this meanes) hindred of their passage, they called to theMuletter, saying. Foolish fellow, what doest thou? Intendest thou tokill the Mule? why dost thou not leade her gently, which is thelikelier course to prevaile by, then beating and misusing her asthou dost? Content your selves Gentlemen (answered the Muletter) youknow your horses qualities, as I doe my Mules, let mee deale withher as I please. Having thus spoken, he gave her so many violentstrokes, on head, sides, hippes, and every where else, as made herat last passe over the Bridge quietly, so that the Muletter wonnethe Mastery of his Mule.

Within a short while after, the Bishop and the Lord Marshal (alwaiesconversing together) it came to passe, that upon Saint johns day, theyriding thorow the City, side by side, and viewing the bravebeauties, which of them might best deserve to win the prize: theByshop espied a yong married Lady (which our late greevouspestilence bereaved us of) she being named Madame Nonna de Pulci,and Cousine to Messer Alexio Rinucci, a Gentleman well knowne untous all. A very goodly beautifull yong woman she was, of delicatelanguage, and singular spirite, dwelling close by S. Peters gate. ThisLady did the Bishop shew to the Marshall, and when they were come toher, laying his hand uppon her shoulder, he said. Madam Nonna, Whatthinke you of this Gallant? Dare you adventure another wager with him?

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е70ʲػ´սλоʿͷ The yong Maiden, seeing the time to be so farre spent, albeit theold mans words did much dismay her, yet she thus replyed. If it be thewill of heaven, both you and I shall be defended from anymisfortune: but if any such mischance do happen, I account themeanes lesse deserving grief, if I fall into the mercy of men, then tobe devoured by wild beasts in this Forrest. So, being dismountedfrom her horse, and entred into the homely house; shee supt poorelywith the old man and his wife, with such meane cates as theirprovision affoorded: and after supper, lay downe in her garments onthe same poore pallet, where the aged couple tooke their rest, and wasvery well contented therewith, albeit she could not refraine fromsighing and weeping, to be thus divided from her deare Pedro, of whoselife and welfare she greatly despaired. ϸ

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е70๫ǰ3ӿ˹ Calandrino (who was close by them) hearing these wordes, andseeing the whole manner of their wondering behaviour: becameconstantly perswaded, that hee had not onely found the precious stone;but also had some store of them about him, by reason he was so neereto them, and yet they could not see him, therefore he walked beforethem. Now was his joy beyond all compasse of expression, and beingexceedingly proud of so happy an adventure: did not meane to speakeone word to them, but (heavily laden as hee was) to steale homefaire and softly before them, which indeede he did, leaving them tofollow after, if they would. Bruno perceiving his intent, said toBuffalmaco: What remaineth now for us to doe? Why should not we gohome, as well as hee? And reason too, replyed Bruno. It is in vaine totarry any longer heere: but I solemnly protest, Calandrino shall nomore make an Asse of me: and were I now as neere him, as not longsince I was, I would give him such a remembrance on the heele withthis Flint stone, as should sticke by him this moneth, to teach hima lesson for abusing his friends. ϸ

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